ARBA Digital Library

American Rabbit Breeders Association

ARBA Bulletin 1966 Vol. 1, No. 2 – March
Collection: 1966 ARBA Bulletins

Title

ARBA Bulletin 1966 Vol. 1, No. 2 – March

Subject

ARBA member periodicals

Description

Creator

American Rabbit Breeders Association

Publisher

American Rabbit Breeders Association

Date

1966

Rights

This Item is protected by copyright and/or related rights. You are free to use this Item in any way that is permitted by the copyright and related rights legislation that applies to your use. For other uses you need to obtain permission from the rights-holder(s). http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/

Language

English



Citation
American Rabbit Breeders Association, “ARBA Bulletin 1966 Vol. 1, No. 2 – March,” ARBA Digital Library, accessed May 29, 2024, https://arbalibrary.org/item/22.
Text

ARBA
BuPfoiw
Vol. I
March, 1966
No. 2
Features:
Can U.S. Feed World?
Specialty Clubs Yearbook Deadline Clothes Pins In Rabbitry Penn. State Recognizes Rabbits New England Show Circuit Dubbell Works For Research Rabbit Judging and Judges
> OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF AMERICAN RABBIT BREEDERS ASSOCIATION
v
^utletivt
AMERICAN RABBIT BREEDERS ASSOCIATION
W. E. (Bill) Molen, editor Ed Toebbe Ed Schuhmann
Managing Editor Copy Director
EXECUTIVE BOARD ARBA
Wayne Willmann James Blyth
President Secretary
Oren Reynolds Ellis Murray
Vice-President Treasurer
DIRECTORS
Tommy Andrews W. H. Kennedy
Fred Applegate J. Cyril Lowit
Vern Ashton E. P. Shilliday
Claude Bennett Edward Stahl
Edward Toebbe
PRESIDENTS' MESSAGE
RESEARCH — that is the word I would like to impress upon your thinking. Write this above your desk. We need to give much thought to it.
First of all — I’m thinking of Research as it pertains to our rabbits used for meat and medical purposes. There is a great need for more Research Centers that will do something with and for our rabbits. Some of these centers are needed to help us grow a better product, and some are needed to use our rabbits for experimental purposes. Especially is this so because the station at Fontana, Calif, is closed. In most of our States — these Research Centers can be established in connection with Agricultural schools. Mr. Robert Dubbell is doing a lot of work to get one located at the University of Arkansas. Mr. W. E. Molen is busy in trying to make such a center possible in Kansas. The Indiana breeders have been encouraged to work more closely with Purdue University. The Michigan breeders have heard the call from some Professors at Michigan State Univ. What are you doing in your state? What will you do?
Over five million dollars was paid out last year for laboratory animals. Since the rabbit is ideal for so many tests, our breeders should be getting a good share of these millions. Are we ready to do something about it?
Animals for laboratory purposes must be of top quality. Do you realize how important that is? Too many rabbits of inferior quality are being sent to labor-
Page Two
atories. Good animals are so hard to find that people have to buy stock and have it shipped many miles because there is none available in the state where they are to be used.
If you have diseased animals—contact your local veterinarian who should arrange to have the animal sent for autopsy. The schools of Veterinary medicine seldom get such animals therefore they graduate young doctors who know nothing about the rabbit. Research for better animals is a great challenge. What will you do about it?
Again—I am thinking about Research —as it pertains to our rabbits in the show room—especially in this matter of picking the “Best in the Show”. At the Pomona Convention I listened to all the arguments pro and con on this subject. Not one argument was backed up with factual evidence. Everything expressed was personal opinion. After speaking witlj several breeders and officers, I decidec that a little Research would have to be done on this matter if we were ever to come to a better understanding of what really is involved. Two clubs in Illinois and one Fair show in North Carolina asked me for permission to try the experiment and I gave my permission — with the clear understanding that this was for Research only. I did not tell them how to do it or who should do it. I want the breeders to find out for themselves if it can be done successfully. Of course I have been criticized for this action, because Show Rule No. 6 forbids doing such a thing. I knew this had already been done at a California show before the Convention and I have a report of how that was done and the results. I was surprised on February 2nd when I received my January Small Stock Magazine to read that the Arizona State Fair show had done the same thing last November under the supervision of Judge Don Guthrie. Hi says, “I’m sure that all present felt it wa.'l a most interesting experiment”. I would like reports on that show from breeders who are pro and con on this subject. Four or five shows should be enough to furnish me with all the evidence I need when I present the matter to our Board of Directors for consideration, which it decided it would do at the Louisville Convention. The Board is in control of the show rules and not the general membership. I see no reason for any other shows conducting this experiment, so shall not issue any more permits. Show Rule 6 is still in force. You may find fault with my action but I feel I have a responsibility to the large number of members who are interested. Evidence is far more important than personal opinions. So I resort to Research to bring out the necessary facts. Some members will not agree with my efforts—but at least they will have to
PRESIDENT WAYNE WILLMANN
admit that my action in this matter agrees with my policy that the members of our Association shall have a voice in saying what is good or bad for the ARBA. This is a matter for Research. Let us consider it in that light.
I appeared as a guest panelist at the Indiana Rabbit School, Purdue University, Lafayette, Indiana January 22 and also at the Michigan Rabbit School, at the state university. Both of these schools or seminars were well attended, near 80 delegates registered at each event.
I have also received an Honorary membership card from the American Federation New Zealand Rabbit Breeders, kvalter Mann, secretary. We appreciate this token of fellowship and esteem.
One magazine reported that at the Judges Conference at Pomona Convention, the judges were advised to go over the entries with a damp cloth to see if color markings would come off. Also the statement was made that the ARBA is asking that the judges and show officials shampoo the entries.
Nothing could be farther from the truth. One or two examples were mentioned where animals had been tampered with by the exhibitor and some applied color had rubbed off on the hand. The judges were warned to be more strict in the placement of animals that appeared to have been doctored. The judges were not advised to use damp cloths or to do any shampooing.
Wayne Willmann, president
PUBLICITY - RABBITS FRONT & CENTER
The publicity committee is continuing to plug along on all 8 cylinders. This the second edition of the new format of ARBA Bulletin, evidences the fact we mean business. The March Edition further serves notice that many of our members are also taking the cue—we have another complete coverage Bulletin. One that we can show to prospective members with pride and then shove a membership application under their nose, pick up the membership fee and mail in to Jim Blyth.
There are still some segments of our organization that have not been heard from, we urge all committee chairmen, state and local agents, plus directors of the 9 geographic districts to get your material in. We in the rabbit business, work with the fastest reproducing animal utilized commercially by man—the gestation period is 30 days. Let’s all reduce the gestation period of news to a similar 30 days, don’t kindle your news on the wire. Kindle in the ARBA news-bulletin box, Bill Molens mailbox, that is.
Send your news to Bill Molen, Editor and publicity chairman of ARBA. Address, Box 8, Bronson, Kansas 66716. Send the material in as soon as possible and as often, you do not have to be an accomplished writer. We will gladly edit and rewrite all material, when this is needed.
All material for the Bulletin goes to Bill Molen except for advertising. Advertising copy must be prepared and in the printers hands by at least 15 days before mailing the finished Bulletin. Advertising copy, mail direct to Ed Toebbe, 7400 Smyrna Road, Louisville, Ky. 40228.
News contributors and correspondents for this March issue, include, Don Reid, Diane Ford, Merle Emery, Bett Hickman, J. Milton Hood, Mrs. L. W. Ghent, Ray Hettler, Dan Harrell, Jce Lutes, Marie Harrell, Claude Wagner, Jim Butler, Wilbur Starr, Wayne Willmann, Jim Blyth. Bob Dubbell, Dorothy Newport, Roy Kiehle, Ed Stahl. Material has been received to cover subjects such as, sweep-stakes, Pro & Con, Management & Marketing Earthworms, Profitable Production 10 Points, How To Get Rid of Recessive Genes, Exporting Rabbits to Foreign Countries, Sponsorship of ARBA National Convention & Show, also following committee chairmen have promised material for next issue: Jock Ingels, Membership Service; Lou Slavens, Color & Fur; Bill Schaefer, Shows-Rules-Planning. Look for all of these timely articles plus many more in May issue ARBA Bulletin.
Page Three
CAN THE U.S. FEED THE WORLD
Rabbits Could Be The Answer
The problem of feeding the peoples of the world is rapidly becoming acute. Death from malnutrition is a killer that claims 10,000 lives every day.
Expectations from the world wide populance seems to designate the U. S. to assume a major role in the alleviation of this crisis. The executive branch of the U. S. government, the department of agriculture and a majority of the legislative branch of our government seem to recognize this problem and seem willing to impose this awesome burden upon the country.
With the rapid removal of much of our former farmland from production because of the population explosion within our own boundaries, new and perhaps unusual practices must be forthcoming. Research in the field of other and new food sources must be the prime order of movement. Rabbits with their unparalled ability to produce protein packed food, in the shortest known time of any animal, must be the answer. At least the opportunity to fill a large portion of this need is present in the rabbit.
It is our duty to call this to the attention of the proper persons. Persons such as secretary of agriculture Orville L. Freeman, Representative Harold D. Cooley, Senator George McGovern and Representative Lynn E. Stalbaum.
Pressure mounts to drop production controls and expand agricultural production.
One of the big problems that will confront Congress when it convenes is whether the omnibus farm bill that was
passed at the session last year will be junked and that full farm production be permitted in order to ease the world food crisis.
This became evident at an organization meeting held last week by the Committee on the World Food Crisis, which endorsed the policy of bringing back into cultivation the more than 50 million acres of farm land that has been retired.
Formation of the new organization has been of real concern to Secretary of Agriculture Orville L. Freeman and members of his staff. Secretary Freeman has held the position that unlimited expansion of farm production would result in a tremendous increase in the USDA budget at a time when President Lyndon B. Johnson has been pressuring the Secre-^^k tary to reduce the present USDA budget
Reread this article over carefully. Then^^F compose your letters and mail immediately to any of the above named government servants and officials. Impress upon Representative Lynn E. Stalbaum, that part 3 of his four-point program most assuredly should include research in RABBITS. The important point to bring out, a female rabbit can reproduce her own body weight in wholesome, nourishing meat—10 times her own body weight, per year.
Freeman Concerned
Secretary Freeman sought to have the meeting abandoned or at least postponed indefinitely, but the new group argued that plans had gone too far for either.
John A. Schnittker, undersecretary of agriculture, addressed the meeting and he
POSSIBLE ESTABLISHMENT of a U. S. Experimental Station in Fort Scott was discussed recently by this quartet (from left) Herbert Layton, Cleveland; Wayne Will-mann, president of the ARBA; Mayor A. P. Parks and W. E. Molen, prominent bronson rabbit raiser. A survey of possible sites was made following the discussion, and a tract of land on Arthur Street received enthusiastic approval.
This is only one of the first steps in a series of hurdles to be surmounted before final approval.
Page Four
stated that while stocks of dairy products, feed grains and wheat, are reduced from their previous peaks, they are in ample supply to meet prospective demands until the harvest next year. He stated that he saw no reason to reverse the policy of the Administration by releasing controls to hold down production.
However, opposing the USDA is a host of powerful men in Washington who want the position of the Administration reversed. Among these is Rep. Harold D. Cooley, chairman of the House Agriculture Committee, who said that it is about time for the Administration to “do an about face” insofar as domestic farm policy is concerned. In an impassioned speech, he said that there is a need for a major policy switch to loosen the cords which bind agriculture and to wage an all-out battle against starvation in many areas of the globe.
Sen. McGovern for Expansion
Another opponent of the Administration’s farm policy is Sen. George McGovern, former director of the Food for Peace program. He has ready a bill for introduction in Congress when it convenes that will permit farmers to produce enough food for world needs and will guarantee them a fair price for products grown for both domestic and foreign usage.
Rep. Stalbaum Has Program
A four-point program for America, aimed at the development of agricultural
facilities of the underdeveloped nations and growth of new commercial markets all over the world was outlined by Wisconsin Congressman Lynn E. Stalbaum.
1. Development of capital agricultural facilities of other world nations. (Processing, mechanical equipment for irrigation, dockage, shipping and storage.)
2. Aid in improving production methods and goals and developing a practical farm credit system.
3. Provide for research in other food sources, such as marine.
4. Coordinate efforts with the underdeveloped nations, United Nations, commercial companies and other groups, including hmanitarian organizations.
"All this,” Rep. Stalbaum declared, “is a tremendous challenge. It may be the greatest we will ever have in our lifetime.”
The Wisconsin lawmaker, a member of the House Agriculture Committee, said obstacles can be overcome, pointing out that if “we as a nation can think in terms of sending men to the moon, certainly we are capable of developing programs which will use our abundance to mitigate starvation in the world without destroying related commercial activities.”
In voicing support for the United States’ further projection of the Food for Peace program through a rebalancing of this nation’s domestic farm policy, Rep. Stalbaum said it should move from “one of restriction and surplus disposal to one of utilization of agricultural productive capacity increasingly directed towards world nutritional needs.”
REGISTRATIONS FOR JANUARY 1966
New Zealands . 171 Checkered Giants . . ... .8 Angoras 3
^^Californians 43 Dutch . . . .8 Rex 2
•jKlpmish . . . 24 Satins ... .6 Silver Martens 2
^^Champ. D’Argents . ...10 Amer. Chinchilla . .. ...A Polish 1
GRAND CHAMPIONS FOR JANUARY 1966 Owner Breed Private Ear No. Reg. No.
R. Harris Dutch .. AV66
R. W. Berry Dutch 131B
R. W. Berry . .. . Dutch K1 . .
R. W. Berry . . .. Polish EO-1
J. Eve . ... English Spot E2 . .
R. Musser .... New Zealand W MS2
L. Henningsen .... New Zealand 2627 .
G. J. Leger New Zealand W CK2
J. Croker ,. .. Dutch ... AC58
J. Croker . ... English Spot T187
J. Croker ... Dutch J1 ..
P. Naylor Satin JJC .
P. Naylor Satin 2TL .
J. R. Eibling . .. . New Zealand HRU
J. L. Kipor . ... New Zealand X58 .
K & K Rabbitry . . .. Flemish K47 .
.. .3788-X .. ,3709-X ...3708-X ..,3710-X . . . 3017-X .. 3250-X ...9994-U ... 544-X .. 224-X
...2092-X ... 240-X .. . 3366-X . . . 3367-X . . 2515-X .. 4101-X ...5910-V
Page Five
SANCTIONED ARBA SHOWS
M sure only your Show Secretary applies for ARBA Sanction so that we have the proper name in this calendar.
Richmond R. B. Ass’n—Mrs. Virginia Flournoy, Rt. 1, Box 585.
Mechanicsville, Va............................................Mar. 4-5, 1966
Stark Co. R. B. Ass’n—Mrs. John Ritz, 2950 Harmont Ave., Canton, O...Mar. 5-6, 1966
Marmaton River Rabbit Club—Darla Beth Molen, Box 8, Bronson, Kansas . Mar. 5-6, 1966
Trinity Valley R. Club—Marilyn Singer, Rt. 1, Box 393, Baytown, Tex..Mar. 6, 1966
Tibbar R. B. Ass’n—Geraldine Montgomery, R 1, Box 217, Tinley Park, 111. . Mar. 6, 1966 Michigan State R. B. Ass’n—Raymond Wells, 2435 S. Main,
Ann Arbor, Mich.................................................Mar. 10-12, 1966
Smoky Mtn. R. B. Ass’n—Mrs. T. H. Conner, 917 Moody Ave.,
Knoxville, Tenn............................................Mar. 11-12, 1966
Gaston Co. R. B. Ass’n—R. G. Watson, 7 No. Main St., Belmont, N. C...Mar. 12, 1966
Baltimore Co. R & C B Ass’n—Warren J. McNamara, Rt. 2, Box 36,
Reisterstown, Md..............................................Mar. 13, 1966
Morrow Rabbit Raisers—Eileen Ghent, RR 1, Mt. Gilead, Ohio ..........Mar. 13, 1966
Kaw Valley Rabbit Club—Pete Naylor, 2019 N. 13th, Kansas City, Kan...Mar. 13, 1966
South Plains R. B. Ass’n—Lois Scharnberg, P. O. Box 405, Lubbock, Texas .. Mar. 13, 1966
Badger Rabbit Breeders—Ruth Strunk, Rt. 2, Ft. Atkinson, Wise........Mar. 13, 1966
Gulf Coast Rabbit Club—Alma Ogg, Rt. 3, Box 64, Orange, Texas .......Mar. 13, 1966
Fort Wayne R. B. Ass’n—Robert J. Gebhart, 2105 Covington Rd.,
Fort Wayne, Ind............................................Mar. 18-20, 1966
State of Indiana N. Z. Breeders—John K. Jordan, Sr., RR$2,
Hartford City, Ind............................................Mar. 19, 1966
American Chinchilla R. B. Ass’n—Robert J. Gebhart, 2105 Covington Road,
Fort Wayne, Ind...............................................Mar. 19, 1966
Texas R. B. Ass’n—D. E. Geddes, Box 65, Arcadia, Texas ................Mar. 19-20, 1966
Californian Rabbit Club of Calif.—George B. Sutherland, 16041 Hayland,
Valinda, Calif................................................Mar. 20, 1966
Northern 111. R. Ranchers—Alan Davidson, 830 Cambridge, Mundelein, 111. . .Mar. 20, 1966
Satin Rabbit Breeders of Calif.—George B. Sutherland, 16041 Hayland,
Valinda, Calif................................................Mar. 20, 1966
Pima County Fair—Hazel Monroe, Rt. 3, Box 133, Tucson, Ariz....Mar. 22-27, 1966
Akron Rabbit Club—M. L. Clevenger, 428 Palm Ave., Akron, Ohio .........Mar. 25-26, 1966
Pony Express R. B. Ass’n—Cecil N. Green, 1809 Beattie St.,
St. Joseph, Mo..................................................Mar. 26-27, 1966
Tulsa R. B. Ass’n—Bill Spicer, 1710 E. 71st No. Tulsa 30, Okla.........Mar. 26-27, 1966
Show Me State Am. Ck. Gt. Club—Darla Beth Molen, Box 8,
Bronson, Kansas ................................................Mar. 26-27, 1966
South Jersey R & C B Ass’n—Harry S. Claus, 6236 Washington Lane,
Cornwells Heights, Pa.......................................Mar. 27, 1966
Grundy County R. B.—Mrs. Barbara Morphey, RR, Dwight, 111............Mar. 27, 1966
Fairfield Co. R. B. Ass’n—Victor T. Sweetland, 264 Chestnut Hill Ave.,
Norwalk, Conn.................................................Mar. 27, 1966
Mall City R. B. Ass’n—William M. Smith, 10507 Weatherfield,
Kalamazoo, Mich...............................................Apr. 1-2, 1966
R. C. Commercial Club—Arkansas Fed. Rabbit Clubs—Charles Blender, Rt. 2,
Searcy, Ark...................................................Apr. 2-3, 1966
Piedmont Rabbit Club—Mrs. W. V. Burns, P. O. Box 354, Matthews, N. C.Apr. 2, 1966
Three Corners Rabbit Club—Romona Schlotthauer, 208 East B St., Box 513,
Ellinwood Kansas..............................................Apr. 2-3, 1966
Western Mass. R. B. Ass’n—Grace A. Carbonneau, Granville Road, Box 311,
Southwick, Mass...............................................Apr. 3, 1966
North Texas R. B. Ass’n—Andrews Rodriguez, 2020 Pleasant Dr.,
Dallas, Texas ................................................Apr. 3, 1966
Stanislaus Co. R. B. Ass’n—Mrs. Dorothy Kahl, P. O. Box 991, Sonora Calif. . .Apr. 3, 1966
North Central Iowa R. F. Ass’n—LuVeme Vannatta, Box 317,
Cherokee, Iowa .............................................Apr. 3, 1966
Little Kanawha Rabbit Club—Betty A. Wingrove, P. O. Box 62,
Waverly, W. Va..................................................Apr. 15-16, 1966
Mid Counties R. B. Ass’n—Stan Freed, 1607 E. Sycamore, Kokomo, Ind...Apr. 16, 1966
Falls Cities R. B. Ass’n—Harold C. Quick, 4619 So. 1st, Louisville, Ky.Apr. 16-17, 1966
American English Rabbit Club—Clair Shafer, Box 1, Shubert, Nebr........Apr. 16-17, 1966
Council of Calif. ARBA Clubs—Rosalie Sterner, 520 7th Ave.,
Menlo Park, Calif...............................................Apr. 16-17, 1966
Harvey Co. R. Ass’n—Ramon Block, Box 422, Moundridge, Kansas ..........Apr. 16-17, 1966
Pecos Valley R. B. Ass’n—Mrs. John E. Fry, Rt. 2, Box 153-R,
Roswell N. Mex..................................................Apr. 16-17, 1966
Page Six
30-May 1, 1966
30-May 1, 1966 1966
1966
1966 1966
Austin R. B. Ass’n—Mrs. Dan Harrell, 8816 Georgian Dr., Austin, Tex...Apr. 17, 1966
Elgin R. B. Club—John Buehler, Rt. 2, Dekalb, 111.....................Apr. 17, 1966
Niagara Frontier Rabbit Club—Sybil Myers, 5998 Stone Road,
Lockport, N. Y..................................................Apr. 17, 1966
Lima R & C B Ass’n—Dale Place, Rt. 3, Wapakaneta, Ohio ...............Apr. 17, 1966
Free State R. B. Ass’n—Mina S. Uebel, Rt. 1, Mt. Airy, Md.............Apr. 17, 1966
Northampton Co. R. B. Ass’n—Charles Werkheisen, 533 E. Main St.,
Bath, Pa......................................................Apr. 17, 1966
New Jersey State R. B. Ass’n—Mary Battista, S-M Farm,
Neshanic Sta., N. J...........................................Apr. 23-24, 1966
Greater Pgh., R. B. Ass’n—W. H. Kennedy, 222 Soose Road, Pgh 19, Pa.Apr. 23-24, 1966
Van Wert R. B. Ass’n—Richard Smith, RR 1, Van Wert, Ohio .............Apr. 24, 1966
Kanakee Valley R. B.—Mrs. Mary A. Strom, 2220 Black Road, Joliet, 111.Apr. 24, 1966
Ohio Cavy Club—Mrs. Eileen Ghent, RR 1, Mt. Gilead, Ohio .............Apr. 24, 1966
Lawrence Co. R. B. Ass’n—Betty Simbeck, Rt. 2, Old Florence Hwy,
Lawrenceburg, Tenn............................................Apr. 29-30, 1966
Ohio Californian Rabbit Club—Hildred Crabbs, 442 Tracy St.,
Mansfield, Ohio ..............................................Apr. 29-30, 1966
Western Mich. R. B. Ass’n—Donna Beemer, 0-1170 Lincoln Rd.,
Grand Rapids, Mich............................................Apr. 29-30, 1966
Iowa State R. B. Ass’n—Mrs. Ethel Becicka, 5000 J St., S. W.
Cedar Rapids, Iowa .....................................Apr. 30-May 1, 1966
jOhio Flemish Gt. R. B. Ass’n—Herb Anthony, 746 Garfield Ave.,
Newark, Ohio .......................................... Apr. 30-May 1, 1966
Richland Co. R. B. Ass’n—Hildred Crabbs, 442 Tracy St.,
Mansfield, Ohio ........................................Apr.
Beehive R. B. Ass’n—Dorothy Park, 3616 So. 200 West,
Salt Lake City, Utah ...................................Apr.
Capitol District R. F.—Shirley A. Kenyon, Box 383, RD 4, Troy, N. Y.......May 1,
Progressive Rabbit Club—Mrs. Chester L. Roberts, 4742 Parkview,
Kansas City, Kansas ............................................May 1,
Terre Haute R & C B Ass’n—Donald E. Cook, 1320 1st Ave.,
Terre Haute, Ind....................................................May 1,
Long Island R. B. Ass’n—Thomas A. Farmer, 115 Cedar Ave., Islap, N. Y.....May 1,
Mattatuck R. B. Ass’n—Edmund Roman, 317 Clinton St., New Britain, Conn. . .May 1, 1966 Ill.-Ind. Am. Ck. Gt. R. Club—Ivan R. Holmes, 440 Pulaski Rd.,
Calumet City, 111.............................................May 6-8, 1966
Central East Mo. R. B. Ass’n—Mrs. Ed Lawson, R 1, Frankford, Mo.....May 7-8, 1966
Lebanon Valley R & C B Ass’n—Alfred W. Fisher, RD 1, Box 505,
Palmyra, Pa......................................................May 8, 1966
Portsmouth R. B. Ass’n—Marion Bess, Jersey Ridge Rd., Maysville, Ky. . .May 14-15, 1966 New England N. Z. R. B. Ass’n—Marvin F. Carley, 216 Canal St.,
Brattleboro, Vt.....................................................May 15, 1966
Huron Co. Rabbit Club—Wells Ortner, Collins, Ohio ..................May 14-15, 1966
Williams Co. R. B. Ass’n—Mrs. K. O. Engler, 313 N. Elm St.,
Edgerton, Ohio ...............................................May 14-15, 1966
I Bucks Co. R & C B Ass’n—Sarah Siegrist, RD 1, Collegeville, Pa..........May 15, 1966
I Iowa Progressive Rabbit Club—C. J. Miller, 303 6th St., S, Kalona, Iowa_May 15, 1966
Kiam Egyptian R. B. Ass’n—Marilyn Ward, Fairview Dr, Spaeta, 111...May 15, 1966
Victoria Exhibition—Donald C. Mathison, 1217 Douglas St.,
Victoria, B. C., Canada ......................................May 16-21,
Tri Co. R. B. Ass’n—Dennis Janisee, Rt. 2, Box 122, Grafton, Wise.........May 21,
Springfield R. B. Ass’n—C. C. Russell, 619 N. Grant Ave., Springfield, Mo. . .May 21-22,
P & O Rabbit Club—Mabel Brucker, Rt. 2, Box 251, West Middlesex, Pa.......May 22,
Ohio Rex R. B. Ass’n—Joan Wallace, Rt. 5, Box 206, Ashland, Ohio..............May 22,
Tri County R. B. Ass’n—Lawrence A. Schutten, 3416 South 9th St.,
Milwaukee, Wise.....................................................May 22, 1966
Council Bluffs R. B. Ass’n—Mrs. Violet Smith, 302 East Orchard Ave.,
Council Bluffs, Iowa ...........................................May 22, 1966
Green Mountain R. B. Ass’n—Mrs. Sheila Rondeau, Rutland, Vt...............May 29, 1966
State Line Rabbit Club—Mrs. Gladys Fuller, Box 238, Wauseon, Ohio...June 4-5, 1966
Morrow Rabbit Raisers—Eileen Ghent, RR 1, Mt. Gilead, Ohio..............June 4-5, 1966
Tri State Rabbit Club—Mabel Brucker, Rt. 2, Box 251, West Middlesex, Pa. June 5,
Tri City R. B. Ass’n—Mrs. Helen Forsberg, R 2, Box 150 A, Davenport, Iowa .June 5, Coshocton Rabbit Club—Jack Wireman, 5475 Seeman St., S. W.,
Navarre, Ohio .................................................June 12, 1966
Mad River Valley R & C B Ass’n—Sylvia M. Bailey, RR 4, Box 37,
Bellefontaine, Ohio ............................................June 19, 1966
San Diego Co. Fair—Wm. M. Turnquist, Del Mar, Calif...........June 24-July 4, 1966
Page Seven
1966
1966
1966
1966
1966
1966
1966
Alameda County Fair—James W. Trimingham, P. O. Box 579,
Pleasanton. Calif...............................................July 3-17, 1966
Sonoma Co. Fair & Expo—James F. Lyttle, P. O. Box 1451,
Santa Rosa, Calif...............................................July 20-30, 1966
Lake County Fair—L. A. Northausen, P. O. Box 27, Grayslake, 111........July 27-31, 1966
Mother Lode Fair—B. S. Craig, 220 S. Southgate Dr., Sonora, Calif......July 28-31, 1966
Multnomah Co. Fair—Duane Hennessy, P. O. Box 71,
Gresham, Oregon ........................................July 28-Aug. 6, 1966
Rock Island Co. Fair—Mrs. Evelyn Ristau, P. O. Box 267, E. Moline, 111.Aug. 2-6, 1966
Napa Town & Country Fair—Robert P. Manasse, Fairgrounds, Napa, Calif. . .Aug. 4-7, 1966 Allentown Fair—Moulton L. C. Frantz, 1239 V2 Tilghman St.,
Allentown, Pa...................................................Aug. 5-13, 1966
Lenawee Co. Fair—William E. Martin, 5455 So. Adrian Rd., R 2,
Adrian, Mich....................................................Aug. 7-13, 1966
Howell Co. Heart of Ozarks Fair—Robert M. Pease, Jr., c/o Pease-Moore Mill,
204 E. Broadway, West Plains, Mo................................Aug. 8-13, 1966
Mower County Fair—Arnold M. Johnson, R 1, Box 148, Austin, Minn........Aug. 8-14, 1966
Western Michigan Fair Ass’n—Hans C. Rasmussen, R 1,
Ludington, Mich.................................................Aug. 12-16, 1966
State Fair of Wisconsin—Vernon G. Wendland, State Fair Pk,
W. Allis, Wise..................................................Aug. 12-21, 1966
Cedar Rapids Small Stock Ass'n—Mrs. Ethel Becicka, 5000 J St., S. W.,
Cedar Rapids, Iowa .............................................Aug. 13-14, 1966
Scioto Co. Agri. Society—Marion Bess, Jersey Ridge Rd., Maysville, Ky. . Aug. 15-19, 1966
Morrow Co. Fair—Eileen E. Ghent, R 1, Mt. Gilead, Ohio.................Aug. 15-20, 1966
Douglas County Fair—Bert L. Allenby, Box 759, Roseburg, Oregon ........Aug. 16-20, 1966
Washington County Fair—Betty Shearer, 1455 SE 21st Ave.,
Hillsboro, Ore..................................................Aug. 16-20, 1966
Clermont Co. Fair—Fred C. Kipp, 4351 Mt. Carmel-Tobasco Rd.,
Cincinnati, Ohio ...............................................Aug. 16-20, 1966
Del Norte Co. Fair—C. W. Glover, P. O. Box 26, Crescent City, Calif....Aug. 19-21, 1966
Colorado State Fair—Marjorie Vaughn, 2416 Rice St., Pueblo, Colo.......Aug. 21-27, 1966
Lake County Fair—Mrs. J. H. Belcher, 480 King Highway, Mentor, Ohio . Aug. 24-28, 1966
Terre Haute R & C B Ass’n—Donald E. Cook, 1320 1st Ave.,
Terre Haute, Ind................................................Sept. 9-11, 1966
Tennessee Valley Agri & Ind Fair—Crosby Murray, Box 6066,
Knoxville, Tenn.................................................Sept. 9-17, 1966
Los Angeles Co. Fair—Phil D. Shepherd, P. O. Box 2250, Pomona, Calif. . .Sept. 16-21, 1966 Western Washington Fair—John H. McMurray, P. O. Box 189,
Puyallup, Wash..................................................Sept. 17-25, 1966
Iowa Progressive Rabbit Club—C. Jay Miller, 303 S. 6th St., Kalona, Iowa . Sept. 18, 1966
Tulare County Fair—A. C. Slinde, 1495 E. Burton, Tulare, Calif.........Sept. 20-25, 1966
Sandusky Valley R. B. Ass’n—Mrs. Clarence Counts, 1800 Crystal Ave.,
Findlay, Ohio ..................................................Sept. 24-25, 1966
Tri State Rabbit Club—Mabel Brucker, Rt. 2, Box 251, West Middlesex, Pa. . .Sept. 25, 1966 Panhandle South Plains Fair—Mr. A. B. Davis, P. O. Box 208,
Lubbock, Texas .........................................Sept. 26-Oct. 1, 1966
Lorain Co. Rabbit Club—Mrs. Mike Honashofsky, RD 2, West Ridge Rd.,
Elyria, Ohio ...................................................Oct. 1-2, 1966
Washington Co. R. B. Ass’n—Mrs. Ruth Caldwell, RD 2, Box 247,
Washington, Pa..................................................Oct. 2, 1966
Arkansas Livestock Expo.—Clyde E. Byrd, P. O. Box 907, Little Rock, Ark. . Oct. 4-8, 1966
Fresno District Fair—T. A. Dodge, 1121 Chance Ave., Fresno, Calif......Oct. 6-16, 1966
Auto City R. B. Ass’n—Angeline Ellis, 21224 Sherman, Southfield, Mich..Oct. 8, 1966
North Central Iowa R. F. Ass’n—LuVerne Vannatta, Box 317,
Cherokee, Iowa .................................................Oct. 8-9, 1966
Mississippi R. B. Club—Mrs. Thelma Purser, R 5, Box 22, Jackson, Miss. . .Oct. 10-15, 1966 Pensacola Interstate Fair—John E. Frendel, P. O. Box 255, Pensacola, Fla. . .Oct 17-23, 1965 Greater Jacksonville Fair—Sandra C. Carter, 1245 E. Adams St.,
Jacksonville, Fla...............................................Oct. 19-29, 1966
Progressive Rabbit Club—Mrs. Chester Roberts, 4742 Parkview,
Kansas City, Kan................................................Nov. 5-6, 1966
South Euclid R. F., Inc.—E. P. Shilliday, 5188 Eastover Rd, Cleveland, Ohio . .Nov. 6, 1966 Baltimore Co. R & C B Ass’n—Warren J. McNamara, R 2, Box 36,
Reistertown, Md.................................................Nov. 13, 1966
Council Bluffs R. B. Ass’n—Mrs. Violet Smith, 302 E. Orchard Ave.,
Council Bluffs, Iowa ...........................................Nov. 13, 1966
Beehive R. B. Ass’n—Dorothy Park, 3616 So. 2200 West,
Salt Lake City, Utah ...........................................Dec. 4, 1966
Page Eight
RABBIT JUDGING & JUDGES
BY JAMES BLYTH
A number of times ARBA judges are unduly criticized and ridiculed because of their actions or awards. We believe these people are doing the best they possibly can to improve rabbits and rabbit judging.
There is no doubt some of the judges in the past had it easier than the judges of today. Years ago rabbits were handled more and cleaned up to a greater extent than they are today. For example old timers will recall Raymond Watts, Fred Ruffner, old Belgian Hare breeders of years ago who had their rabbits trained and conditioned to perfection. One would simply tap on the table with his finger and the Belgian would stand up to attention. There were many rabbit breeders at that time who handled their rabbits morning and evening, brushing off the loose fur, slicking the coat down, training their rabbits to stand in a position to best show themselves to the judges. This to me was a great help to judges of the past and believe should be practiced more today by the exhibitors.
Another draw back of today is the judging equipment. Some of this equipment used today is obsolete and was in use 35-40 years ago. In fact some fair shows still are using judging tables and so-called holding pens that have been in use for 35 years. We cannot expect our judges to do a good job with this type of equipment. A judge to do a good job should have proper equipment, plenty of holding pens so he or she can examine the specimen in their natural positions instead of being crowded down on a table by various bunch of handlers or by crowding them into stalls where they cannot be seen. All Associations sponsoring exhibits as well as State and County Fairs should attempt to see the judges are supplied with good equipment so they can do a good job. A rabbit judge must have equipment so he can do his job properly. It sometimes is surprising how remarkable some of our judges can be with the poor equipment they have.
There are many new judges who have served their apprenticeship as a registrar and finally been approved for a judge’s license. These judges are under the impression they know everything now that they have a judge’s license. Far be it from the truth. A person who has worked any kind of a trade or profession knows after they have served their apprenticeship and became a journeyman, they are just beginning to learn. Equipment changes, handling changes, system of conducting a show change, and things crop up in rabbits that are new. Therefore, I would say any person being awarded a judge’s license has just begun to learn. They should
SECRETARY JAMES BLYTH
be cautious, careful and considerate of tht specimens they handle so they will gain this knowledge as quickly as possible. Only the person who has been awarded a judge’s license is permitted to judge. That is the reason we say they are beginning to learn. They are confronted with the real task of the problem of selecting winners. This can only be done by experience and the know how of going about it.
Many breeders know more about the quality and qualifications of their breed than the judge. Therefore, the judge should enter into a discussion or talk with these breeders, visit their rabbitries, look at their rabbits and an understanding of what really constitutes a good rabbit of that breed. Thus improve himself at the expense of the breeder. Most all breeders want their rabbits judged correctly. They are more than willing to explain to any judge the fine points and sometimes show he or she where they have erred in their placements.
Judges should learn about balance, markings, condition. What constitutes a good rabbit of any breed can be learned by a careful study of the ARBA Standard of Perfection and a discussion with the breeders of particular breeds of rabbits as to how the Standard should be applied. The head, ears, body and feet should conform in balance. The rabbit should be smooth and slick, not boney or chopped off, dish hips, sway back among other faults. After a careful study is made of balance and what constitutes a good rabbit of any breed, the Standard can be applied.
Page Nine
Many judges continually brush fur against the grain. This is an undesirable trait in judges which should be discontinued. It only takes one or two brushes to tell if the fur has density, has texture and good strong guard hair. To continue this practice of brushing against the grain, particularly in fancy rabbits, will tend to break the guard hair which protects the under coat. Thus making the coat look moth eaten. There is no real reason for continuing this practice. All of our judges if they would smooth the coat instead of brushing so much against the grain would be better able to properly judge the rabbit and certainly please the exhibitor.
The roundness and smoothness of body is a very important feature. This can best be viewed when the rabbit is in a natural position instead of being squatted, pushed, or rolled down on the judging table. Let the rabbit move in its natural position. This is the best way to view the type of the rabbit.
The rabbits should be placed in coops in view of the judge. Thus, the rabbits can move in their natural position instead of attempting to hold them in stalls or carriers holding them flat on the table. With poor judging tools afforded, exhibitors cannot be too critical of judges, but rather of the show management for not having the proper equipment.
Judges should make a closer study of color, too many poor colored animals are being placed high in awards. Too many judges look in the ear of a rabbit before the award is to be made. This is something that should not be. Some judges say they are looking for ear cankor. I would rather miss a case of ear cankor than be accused of looking for an ear number. While much of this criticism on looking inside the ears before placing the rabbit is due to the suspicion or distrust in the judge by the exhibitor, it is the best practice for the judge not to look inside the ear until he or she is ready to make the placement.
There are a few other things which cause breeders to be distrustful and suspicious of our judges and one of these is when the judge might travel with an exhibitor or haul an exhibitor’s rabbits to a show where they are to officiate. If this is done, the breeder is bound to have suspicion of the judge knowing these rabbits. Therefore, favors them if they win. This should not be. A judge should be sure of themselves, make their own decisions as to the best rabbits in the class, then stand by their decision and listen to no remarks at that time by the exhibitors or any person around the table. It is better to be wrong and honest than right and dishonest. I hope both exhibitors and judges will benefit by these remarks and there will be less confusion
Page Ten
at the judging table, and after the judging.
Every so often there is criticism on exhibitors for faking or cheating in their exhibits. This has happened for many years and it is my opinion as long as we have dishonest people, we will have a certain amount of cheating in rabbit exhibitions. Cheating in the age, color, etc., does a great deal of harm to the fancy. Soon the cheaters will eliminate themselves from being called a good sport or a gentleman. This reputation, is one hard to live down.
The judges are noticing these fake animals on the table and are commenting on them and are remarking among themselves and later on to other breeders as to this condition. It soon gets out a certain exhibitor is dishonest in his practices, therefore, the rabbit fancy as a whole will take offense at such an individual and while she or he may be figuring on winning a class or two with a fake animal, they are losing the respect of the honest conscientious breeders who are trying to perfect their breed. Let’s make 1966— stamp out cheaters year.
These dishonest exhibitors are not kidding anybody. Most always the judge notices these deceptions. Sometimes he cannot be sure of them, therefore, is reluctant to point them out. One can tell by his actions there is something about the rabbit that has been faked or the rabbit is out of class by his actions. In closing this article—who are these exhibitors fooling? They are fooling nobody but themselves. They are holding rabbits for breeding that are inferior, some have disqualifications, some do not meet requirement weights, some lack good color but the exhibitor exhibits them. In turn saves them for breeding. As a result he or she must continue on with them and as a result will spoil or deteriorate their future breedings and they are not breeding toward perfection but towards a full hearty idea of believing they are fooling some judge. We hope this practice will always be curtailed in America and we are sure the honest rabbit fanciers of the United States do not wish to see this practice grow. By cooperation of ARBA judges and sincere honest exhibitors, we can eliminate it and bring the rabbit fancier to a greater height.
BLUE-EYE POLISH
Some nice Stud Bucks for sale.
$10.00 each
WAYNE WILLMANN 2403 Lincoln Ave. Cleveland, Ohio 44134
20% DISCOUNT
to Specialty, State and Local Clubs on their club advertisements I/4 page or larger. Show Ads receive the same discount. And remember you reach every member. Cash with copy, please.
IOWA PRESIDENT LAUDS BULLETIN
Robert F. Wallace, ARBA judge & registrar of Glenwood, Iowa has mailed in the following letter to the editor and publicity chairman.
“First let me say that the ARBA Bulletin, January, 1966, which I received today, is without equal. In my several years in the ARBA I have never seen a better report of what’s going on. It is complete and more than interesting. You certainly were right when you said it would be a big improvement over past bulletins. Hope it continues to be as complete and informative as this first issue.”
We received over 40 letters of encouragement and praise for the first issue which was a fine team effort all the way thru. Wallace, is an administrator of the Iowa State School, as well as serving the
Iowa State RBA as president in 1966. We were most happy to receive all the letters. We solicit not only material and articles but as the case may arise, constructive criticism.
Among our most cherished letters received on this first issue of the Bulletin, is one from ARBA director Ed Stahl. Ed, praised the completeness of the Bulletin, the make-up, captions, etc. This is indeed a compliment to be cherished. Ed Stahl, has been in the rabbit publishing business for over 50 years. His Outdoor Enterprises publications enjoyed world wide acceptance. Ed Stahl, is the only rabbit personality to have appeared in Who’s Who, because of his rabbit and publishing efforts and fame. Ed Stahl, and his rabbit enterprises have been duly recorded and published as one of the State of Missouri’s most unique and famous facet.
THE CHAMPAGNE D'ARGENT RABBIT FEDERATION
Chartered with the A.R.B.A.
A GOOD A GOOD
COMMERCIAL SHOW
RABBIT RABBIT
MEAT BEAUTY
AND FUR AND POISE
Join a Live Wire Specialty Club!
DUES $2.00 PER YEAR
This includes Membership, Guide Book and 12 issues of "THE CHAMPAGNE NEWS"
OREN R. REYNOLDS, Secy. & Treas.
R R 3 Box 509, Decatur, 111. 62526
Page Eleven
SPRING SHOW
FALLS CITIES RABBIT <£ CAVY BREEDERS ASSN.
State Fairgrounds and Exposition Center, Louisville, Ky.
ARBA Sanction
Sweepstakes: NZW & R, Dutch, Amer. Chin., Californian, Checkered Giant, English Spots, Satin, Silver Marten
Judging: 9 a m. Sunday, April 17 (Entry 'til 8 a.m.—early entry appreciated) Secy.: Harold C. Quick, 4619 S. 1st St., Louisville, Ky. 40214
CONVENTION DETAILS
The following have been added to the 1966 Convention organization:
Assistant Secretaries
Mrs. Alice Albright, entries; Mrs. Ann Gardner, Tours; Mrs. Marion Fletcher, Entertainment and Food.
Assistant Superintendents
Willie Heil, Joe Harmon, Charles Embry, Wm. Buggs Hester, Dick Rankin, Burch Good, Wilburn Gardner and A1 Henry.
It is hoped that by next issue all the Breed Chairmen can be announced.
A deadline for copy (advertising, specials, etc.) in the Convention Catalog has been set for July 15th. Advertising rates are as follows: Full Page—$50.00; Half Page—$27.50; Quarter Page—$15.00; Eighth Page—$8.50; Listing—$3.00. The Convention Committee is offering a 5% discount to those who get their advertising in by May 1st.
Show Room Booth rates have been set at; Specialty Club Single—$25.00; Specialty Club Double—$50.00; Commercial
NEW ZEALAND WHITES
"The Old KO Show Strain"
ALL RED, WHITE A BLUE SEAL A Few To Sell
BURCH GOOD
118 Homestead Avenue CLARKSVILLE, INDIANA
Single—$40.00; Commercial Double— $75.00.
Those who want to enjoy the Convention to the fullest will want to get their reservations in to the Kentucky Hotel as soon as possible to insure your choice of accommodations. 100 Rooms at $6.50 and $7.00 single; $10.00 and $10.50 double or twin. 125 Rms at $7.50 and $8.00 single; $11.50 and $12.00 double or twin.
The first 225 rooms will be assigned on a first-come, first served basis. Additional rooms range from $8.50 single; $12.50 up double or twin. Address correspondence: Louisville Rabbit Convention Shows, Inc., 7400 Smyrna Road, Louisville, Ky. 40228.
MEMBERSHIP CONTEST JANUARY 31, 1966
Individuals
1. Edward H. Stahl, Mo................9
2. E. R. McGehee, Okla................5
3. Tommy Andrew, Pa...................3
4. F. R. Applegate, 111...............3
5. O. N. Breid, Mo....................2
6. W. A. DeGraff .....................2
7. Matt Keivl, Texas .................2
8. J. W. Snyder, Pa...................2
Associations
1. Cactus R. B. Ass’n, Ariz...........5
2. So. W. Va. Rabbit Club ............2
3. Progressive R. Club, Kan...........1
4. Stanislaus Co. R. B., Calif........1
5. Southwest R. B. Ass’n, Texas ......1
6. Western 111. R. B. Ass’n ..........1
Page T \\ elve
DOMINICAN REPUBLIC REVOLUTION DETERENT TO RABBIT PROJECT
Bill Molen, in his work with Peace Corps Training Programs over the past couple years has seen many pilot projects succeed, though to varying degrees. It was while lecturing such a Peace Corps Training Class at Kansas State University, Manhattan, Kansas that Molen met Mr. Ludwig fLenney) J. Herrmann, of New York state and a member of this training class. The class numbered 42 prospective assignees to the Dominican Republic and 41 assignees to Guatemala.
Arrangements were made at this time, for any and all volunteers, upon arriving in the assigned country and having facilities constructedi feed available etc; that production type ’ rabbits would be de-i livered to these volunteers in the community and country of their assignment.
The fulfillment of this promise to Len-ney Herrmann, assigned to the Dominican Republic, was completed February 5, 1965. Senator Frank Carlson, of Kansas arranged air transportation and many breeders of Kansas supplied clean, healthy rabbits to the tune of 64 head, weighing 628 pounds. The ratio of 1 buck to 6 does was also attained.
This volunteer shipment of rabbits departed Wichita, Kansas at 4:30 p.m. on February 4, 1965—and arrived at Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic just 23 hours later. Thanks and praise for this worthy venture was received from U. S. government officials, Dominican Republic officials, Lenney and other Peace Corps volunteers, but most welcome of all— thanks from the natives of the various communities wherein the rabbits were received. The revolution or war like atmosphere that soon prevailed over the i Dominican Republic presented many obstacles to overcome in any projects. In fact there was a period of time when some of the volunteers were taken to Puerto Rico on U. S. orders. This inter-
ruption had a definite effect upon the Rabbit Project—however, the Peace Corps Volunteers that complete their stiff training and orientation are dedicated people—they are determined to accomplish that which they set out to do. These Peace Corps Volunteers are the U. S. Government’s most important export to the rest of the world.
For some months there was no contact with Lenney Herrmann relative to the rabbits. This as outlined above was due to the Dominican Republic crisis. Then in mid-summer, Lenney penned a letter to Bill Molen, relative to the status of the rabbit projects. The letter follows:
Dear Mr. Molen,
“Now that the revolution has quieted down a little it seems a good time to try and get in touch with you to give a report on how these rabbits are doing. Aside from some trouble with raw hocks things have been going along well. Several feeds have been experimented with and we now seem to have one which promises to give best results and with which we may be able to produce a pound of rabbit meat for around 28 cents, carcass weight. There is a market in the Capital for rabbit brains and I hope to find some commercial use for the skins. If something can be found then there will be no doubt that rabbits can be a flying success down here. I have only placed 18 rabbits with people so far mainly because of the revolution which has had a very disrupting effect on most activities. There are several 4-H clubs which are very interested in rabbit project not to mention private individuals and four school teachers in my community are interested in forming a cooperative to produce rabbits. All of this is unfortunately pending because of the fighting in the capital and the fact that guerrillas are now fighting in the hills near here, most people are unwilling to make the investment in materials needed. The OAS has taken over paying civil servants but because of the disruption of almost all services no one has been fully paid and in most instances people are
29TH ANNUAL
NATIONAL CHECKERED GIANT RABBIT SHOW
SPONSORED BY: ILL-IND. A.C.G.R.C. INC. CROWN POINT, INDIANA
MAY 6f 7 & 8, 1966
Show Sec’y: Jake Holmes 440 Pulaski Rd: Calumet City, 111. Judge: Ossie Eisenhaur
Trophy For, Each let, B.O.B., B.O.B., Best Sr., 6-8, Jr. & Best Pre-Jr„ Best Display, Best Sportsman
MAR-CEL
White New Zealands
Registered Red, White and Blue Production bred Show Stock that will produce
Good Enough to win: 6 Best of Breeds, 8 Best Opposite Sex at 14 Shows in 1965. Write for descriptive price list
Mar-Cel Rabbit Farms 2168 Canal St., Brattleboro, Vt. 05301
Page Thirteen
again in debt. Unfortunately, I look to the next 6 months as being very slow and more a waiting than working period.”
Lenney’s letter continues with explanations of possible background of this most bloody revolution in Latin America since the Mexican Revolution of 1905. Letters from Lenney in the Dominican Republic have been scarce since this time, though Christmas greetings were received.
Then on February 1, 1966 Robert Ireland, Valley Center, Kansas stopped by the Bill Molen home for a long visit and discussion. Ireland, had returned to the U. S. only the day before from a 2 year stint as a Peace Corps Volunteer assigned to Balboa, Dominican Republic. Ireland, had only the highest praise for Lenney Herrmann and his projects involving rabbits in the Dominican Republic. The Peace Corps Volunteers are assigned to barios, small inhabited communities, and live and work with the natives in country assigned. The first item of business is to earn the love and respect of the natives. Then they embark upon their field of service, education and general usefulness and improvement of conditions. To do this, it has been found and proven, rabbits and rabbit projects are the means by which friendship and trust can be established in the shortest time.
This worthwhile project of Lenney’s can still use help and encouragement— and he can be contacted in two different ways. Mail can be addressed to him as follows: Lenney Herrmann, Peace Corps Volunteer Dominican Republic, c/o Army Post Office, New York, New York 09478 or Lenney Herrmann, Peace Corps Volunteer, c/o U. S. Ambassador, Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic.
COLEMAN GLICK PLANS RETIREMENT
Coleman Glick of the Glick Mfg. Co. will be honored for his many years of service to the rabbit industry and the ARBA at the Annual Banquet of Golden West Rabbit Breeders Assoc., to be held at Knott’s Berry Farm Feb. 12th.
Coleman, has been active in club activities for many years in California. For years, his name has appeared as the leader or near the top in the ARBA membership contest. He has helped with, “The Rabbit
of Tomorrow Fryer Contest”, and its successor, “American Rabbit Fryer Production Contest”. These contests sponsored by the Council of California ARBA Clubs, Southern Area, and held at the Rabbit Experimental Station at Fontana. This contest was eliminated due to the closing of the Government Station at Fontana.
Mr. Glick is considering an early retirement. The ARBA and California friends, thank him for the many efforts that he has put forth to make the rabbit industry a reality for all rabbit breeders.
NEW ZEALANDS LEAD IN REGISTRATIONS—LAG IN GRAND CHAMPIONS
WHAT'S YOUR ANSWER?
In checking over the report in the January ARBA Bulletin of Registrations and Grand Champions, it is noted that a total of 658 rabbits were registered in Nov. and Dec. It is further noted that 331 of these! were New Zealands. Of the 39 Grand Champions only 2 were New Zealands.
In other words the New Zealands registered 331 to 327 for all other breeds, but only recorded 2 Grand Champions.
The Satins registered 33 for the two months period and recorded 11 Grand Champions. The Checkered Giants registered 19 and recorded 5 Grand Champions. The Californians were second high in registration with 84 and recorded 6 Grand Champions. Of course this is only two months period but they were put in such a nice placement that the comparison was easy. Check your January ARBA Bulletin and see what is your answer for the “Reason”.
NOTICE
Smith-Betts combine had an outstanding show record in 1965. SMITH'S "Vol Strain" White New Zealands in 9 shows were awarded 24 first, 20 seconds, 15 thirds, 6 BOB, 2 BOS, 16 specials, 4 best white fur and 3 best displays. BETTS' "Southern Beauty" Californians in 13 shows came home with 32 firsts, 22 seconds, 19 thirds, 8 best Cal fur (3 best white fur), 8 BOB, 7 BOS, 7 best displays and 5 Grand Champion certificates.
We can fill your order NOW with top-quality stock.
W. H. Smith (Judge), Rt. 2, Box 271, Strawberry Plains, Tenn.
Hugh J. Betts (Registrar), 911 Church-well Ave. N. E., Knoxville, Tenn.
WE ARE SORRY
As we go to press for this issue our attention has been called to the omission in the January Bulletin of the State of NEW JERSEY and the name of BOB ROME as the State Agent (representative). We are sorry this happened and ask your pardon. Please add this correction to your records.
Page Fourteen
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8. 9.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
10.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8. 9.
10.
11.
REGISTRATION CONTEST JANUARY 31, 1966
Californian
Emmett Bobo, Texas ................14
Wm. T. Robinson, 111............... 9
G. S. Davis, Iowa ................. 9
Oren R. Reynolds, 111.............. 9
P. D. Ellison, Texas .............. 8
Leland F. Clark, Calif..............7
John Phillips, Calif............... 7
Don Smith, N.Y..................... 6
Robert W. Hill, Fla................ 6
New Zealand
Harold A. Johnson, Mich..........57
Don Reid, 111......................33
Marvin F. Carley, Vt...............30
Claudius Poer, Ind.................26
G. S. Davis, Iowa .................19
Wm. T. Robinson, 111...............18
Lloyd Shantz, Canada ..............15
Robert T. Byrne, Ind...............14
Stuart W. Griffith, Tenn...........13
Sam Gerardi, Pa....................12
General
Harold A. Johnson, Mich..........73
Don Reid, 111......................44
Wm. T. Robinson, 111...............32
Marvin F. Carley, Vt...............31
G. S. Davis, Iowa .................28
Claudius Poer, Ind.................26
Fred Franklin, Mass..............22
G. R. Barnes, Colo...............21
Robert Berry, Texas .............21
Emmett Bobo, Texas .............19
Eugene Lamon, Ala..................19
RABBIT COOKING CONTEST AND SCHOOL
Dorothy Newport and Mrs. C. Jay Miller are attempting to promote the use of [rabbit meat in the every day meal planning of the housewife. A rabbit cook-off contest will be held April 30th at Cedar Rapids, Iowa in conjunction with the Iowa State Rabbit Convention.
Support was solicited from the Chamber of Commerce, Cty. Fair Board, Agriculture Bureau, Cedar Rapids Gazette and radio and TV stations WMT and KCRG. These ladies even contacted the news media of Fort Dodge, Iowa and radio and TV of that city are also cooperating.
Rabbits and rabbit cookery are common bywords in this area of Iowa. The public is being informed daily of the wonders of the nutrition of rabbit meat also the versatility of rabbit prepared dishes. Judges for the various classes of rabbit meat cookery are Jackie Grant, star of ‘Home Fare’ a regional TV program, Jim Lloyd, WMT homemaker program director, Margaret Lee, co-star of
KCRG radio program, ‘Tips & Tunes’. Chef Ivyl Spears, will act as judging consultant. This is the best shot in the arm the rabbit has received in many a year. Even though most of us ARBA members are fanciers—“The cold fact remains, the end result of 95% of the rabbits raised in America is the cooking pot. The rabbit is a meat animal and belongs properly designated as a farm animal”.
Support this very worthy project of the Cedar Rapids Club. A very low entry fee of $1.00 is charged. Prizes of note, such as electric skillets, hair dryers, etc. are being offered. One successful venture such as this rabbit cooking contest, is worth its weight in gold. In fact, it is worth the results obtained in 100 so called Meat Pen classes at open rabbit shows. A cook book is planned and will be published from recipes and dishes at this contest as well as others. Please, contact Dorothy Newport, 2401 Wilson Ave., S.W., Cedar Rapids, Iowa.
RESUME OF NATIONAL SPECIALTY CLUB AND BREED SHOWS
The 1966 ALL SATIN Show will be held in Topsfield, Massachusetts this year. May 14 and 15 are the dates of the show. Topsfield, is located 15 miles North of Boston. Kay Hettler of 141 Morse Rd., Sudbury, Mass, has been named as show chairman so address any correspondence to him. Specials on any variety of SATIN will be accepted. New Zealand breeders who also raise SATINS will be interested in knowing that the New England All New Zealand Show will be held on the same dates at the same place.
The 12th Annual American Checkered Giant Show will be held April 16-17, 1966 at Sedalia, Missouri. A bumper entry is expected. Over $300.00 in premiums will be offered. Judges will be Wayne Will-mann and Leonard Biskie.
The Annual National English Spot Rabbit Show and Convention will be held in Sedalia, Missouri on April 16-17. Clair Shafer, is general chairman. President Ivan Miller and secretary Ward Hatcher, predict the central location will tend to make this the largest entry English show held in recent years. Judge Bill Robinson will handle the judging assignment.
Mr. A. L. King, Amarillo, Texas is the general chairman of the National Dutch Show to be held April 22-23-24, 1966 in Amarillo. The general intense interest in Dutch in Texas, the Rocky Mountain area, the Midland Empire, and the ever faithful Dutch breeders from more distant areas, promises this National Dutch Show to be a record entry show.
Page Fifteen
NECESSITY IS THE MOTHER OF INVENTION or
Cavy Breeders Don't Fight— They Switch
For the past four winters since we went back into Cavies, we have not used heat, practicing the axiom, ‘The strong will survive and the weak perish.’ It might sound good, but it leads to many disappointments.
So when a serious look was taken at the matter of heat, my father came up with the idea of furnishing each pen with its own furnace. In order to achieve what was really desired, a complete new coop was built.
First the top and bottoms were insulated, then the back and sides were insulated. The floors on the undersides are wired to contain a light bulb in each pen. The pens are 30” deep, 48” wide, and 18” high. The front contains two doors, one which is solid and the other which is made of Vfc” hardware cloth. In keeping with a foot (square foot) of air space per placed in these pens. At first regular 25 watt light bulbs were used. But believing
the light bothered their eyes, a blue bulb was placed in the pens. A reflector is placed above the bulb to reflect the heat down. In another, a one pound tobacco can has been reworked to the following: In the center of the bottom a 1%" hole is cut, to enable the base of the light bulb to come through. Then %" holes are drilled around the body of the can, and the top placed back on the can.
Remember, the wiring and light fix-
JUDGE & REGISTRAR LISTINGS
Your name, title and address should be in every issue of the ARBA Bulletin. We are proud of our judging and registration systems and the dedicated members who, through study and work, preserve and perfect both. Annual listing only $1.50.
ARBA JUDGES
I. R. (Jake) Holmes 440 Pulaski Rd. Calumet City, 111.
Oren R. Reynolds
RR 3, Box 509 Decatur, 111. 62526 Phone: 317, 877-6518
Glen C. Carr
Rabbits and Cavies 454 S. Terrace Ave. Columbus, Ohio 43204 Phone: 279-8442
Kirk R. Moore
1909 Buchanan St. Wichita Falls, Texas Phone: 322-5027
Vern N. Ashton
1626 Oakland Parkway Lima, Ohio 45805
Philip A. Macy
210 N. Third St.
Tipp City, Ohio A1 Roerdanz Rabbits and Cavies Rt. 1, Box 51 Kingsville, Ohio 44048 James Blyth Rabbits and Cavies 4323 Murray Ave. Pittsburgh, Pa. 15217 Robert Byrne Rabbits and Cavies 1110 W. Harrison Ave. Clarksville, Ind.
Phone: 283-8657 Edward T. Toebbe Rabbits and Cavies 7400 Smyrna Road Louisville, Ky. 40228 Phone: 502, 969-8362
Dewey H. Mains
Rabbits and Cavies Box 101 Conklin, N. Y.
Marvin F. Carley
216 Canal St. Brattleboro, Vt. 05301 Phone: 802, 254-4396
Duane Shrader
625 S. 51 St.
Lincoln, Nebraska 68510
“Don” Reid
Rabbits and Cavies Rt. 1, Box 159 Lockport, 111. 60441
Horace Curtis
401 E. Jefferson St. Falls Church, Va. Phone: Jeff. 2-3674
ARBA REGISTRARS
Harold Drudge
RR 1, Roann, Ind. Phone: 219, 982-2021
Jack Messner
Box 267A Rothsville, Penn. Phone: 898-2197
E. L. Eary
5215 Alpine Drive Charleston. W. Va. 25312
Page Sixteen
tures are fastened to the top of the pen, enabling the cavies to get under and around the heat coming from the bulbs.
These individual furnaces are placed in the middle of each pen. It is something to watch the way the cavies gather in the area of the heat. Jokingly, I have asked my father when we will be making rocking chairs for them. It looks like a scene from the country store where a group of people are gathered around a pot belly stove.
This coop has been in use since the first part of November. As most cavy breeders know, cavy pens in which greens are fed daily, must be cleaned at least every seven days if not sooner, because they get wet. But after 14 days these coops were not wet and still clean. The beddings which are, ‘chick litter’, or several other types of mixture were not run down. Because the coops were not wet, the droppings worked into the bedding, and therefore the top did not pack down. Thus the wet and dirty conditions, which germs like are eliminated and the animals are happier. The light bulb also worked to prevent germs, because the darkness was gone and the bulb did not take oxygen from the animals.
I do not yet know what it will cost for the electricity, but I do know the benefits derived will more than offset the cost in the long run. This was made a must in order for us to compete in 1966 and protect our investment. We are also no longer trying to get everything out of our females in the Spring and Summer, but are able to use a year-round breeding program.
PUGET SOUND RBA HOST WASHINGTON RABBIT SCHOOL
The 20th Annual Washington State Rabbit School will be held April 16-17 at Jport Orchard, Washington. Site of the school will be, The Active Club Building.
The Puget Sound RBA are host to this event. They have lined up an unusually attractive and informative program, one that will be of the greatest interest and education to the largest segment of people —whether they be commercial minded, fanciers, youth and their problems or folks just curious or mildly interested in rabbits.
The Puget Sound RBA, are to be congratulated for this outstanding effort and they have lined up an impressive panel of speakers. Mr. Ed Chase, is president of the Puget Sound group and Mr. Roy E. Kiehle is serving as publicity chairman. A catalog and program of the Washington State Rabbit School and Seminar will be prepared. To obtain a copy of this publication, write, Roy E. Kiehle, Rt. 1, Box 313A, Poulsbo, Washington 98370.
CAVY JUDGING RESULTS AT POMONA CONVENTION
The complete and official results of judging and placements of cavies at the Pomona Convention were not available at time our January Bulletin went to press.
Now, thanks to Don Reid, Diane Ford and Merle Emery the official results have been tabulated for publication.
There were 23 exhibitors, 172 animals entered, 161 across the table. There were 101 Americans, 34 Peruvians, 26 Absy-sinians.
Best American, Capital “S” Caviary, White Boar.
Best Opp. American Capital “S” Caviary, White Sow.
Best Peruvian, Marolyn Briese, Tortoise shell & white boar.
Best Opp. Peruvian, M. & D. Peruvian Caviary, Diane Ford & Marilyn Wenker, Broken color Sow.
Best Abyssinian, Alan Forrest, Tort, shell & white Sow.
Best Opp. Abyssinian, Peter Shamble, White Boar.
Rabbit Research—Aid To Healing
Scientists at the Univ. of Texas medical branch have reported an important discovery to hasten the recovery of patients suffering from severe bums. Using healing tissue from rabbits and from burn patients at various stages of recovery, the researchers have been tracing nature’s own complex chemical steps in wound healing.
The fuel for car energy is gasoline, whereas the fuel for wound healing, or any other cellular process, comes from a chemical, adenosine triphosphate or ATP. In rabbits, under controlled conditions, it may be about 3 weeks before ATP starts to be formed from the energy contained in glucose; in human patients, it may be months.
Preliminary tests have been made by Israeli scientists wherein a serum may be made from the skin of other burned patients. These preliminary tests were obtained from research with rabbits.
AUSTRALIAN RABBITS
Notice has come to our Commercial Department that a Brooklyn New York firm is importing and offering for human consumption wild Australian rabbits.
In the early 1950’s the ARBA investigated this practice and proved the rabbits were unfit for human consumption. Recently these rabbits have been offered for sale at several Philadelphia markets. Tommy Andrew, past chairman of our
Page Seventeen
the agents should have a copy of the costs of ADDS for the Bulletin and Yearbook. A sample meat carton that can be ordered from the Secretary’s Office—as well as some old Books of Standards that can be used to help educate the youth about the various breeds of rabbits. Send all orders for supplies to Blyth’s office. If we get many calls for some items we do not have, we will know just what we have to prepare for future use. We do not expect agents to sell books—arm patches etc. unless they wish to buy a few of these items for resale purposes. Let Mr. Blyth know what you need.
Commercial dept, has sent a letter of protest to the Federal Food and Drug Administration. We wish many hundreds of our members would do likewise. If you live near where such rabbits are being sold— will you do what you can to stop it??? Let’s give our citizens a better product for their tables. Sell them some good American raised domestic rabbit.
SECRETARY QUARTERLY FINANCIAL REPORT
Secretary Blyth reports an income of $10,974.90 for the months of October, November and December 1965. The expenses were 4,121.07 so he remitted to Treasurer Ellis Murray the sum of 6,853.83. Our expenses will be very high during the first six months of 1966 for we must pay for Bulletins—the new Book of Standards— and the Annual Yearbook. Let us sign up the members so we have workers and the money we need.
SPECIALTY CLUBS
Specialty Clubs will get more attention this year than for many decades. Our Vice-President Oren Reynolds is ready to help the clubs. We notice in the January 3rd report that the American Standard Chinchilla Club had 29 members in 9 states. We believe this record can be greatly improved and we believe there are plans to do it. Hold up your CHINS. How about the other Clubs? Is yours going forward? ? ?
MARCH 31st DEADLINE YEARBOOK COPY
Hurry—send in your renewals and your NEW members—so names—addresses and zip code numbers—will be included in the 1966 Yearbook. March 31 is the deadline. The printer must have the copy early in April if he is to have the book in the mail to our members by May 1. This is the schedule adopted by our ARBA Board. Rush your Add to Mr. Blyth before March 31—if you would like to get it in the YEARBOOK. If twenty-five clubs sent in a 5.00 ADD it would be a great help. Individual breeders are urged to do what you can to let others know what you have to sell.
ARBA SUPPLIES
Many agents are writing Secretary Blyth about supplies for their work. We do not have all we should have—more will be prepared as we have time and someone to help. We do have membership blanks—a few meat posters and booklets on how to prepare rabbit for eating—also
Page Eighteen
CLOTHES PINS IN THE RABBITRY
Nope, we don't hang the little ones up to dry. There is a little practical use for them.
In this fast moving world of ours it seems we are never able to give our rabbits the time and care they really deserve.
Out of this necessity came a plan we have used for so long, I honestly don’t remember whether it was my original idea or whether I picked it up at another rabbitry or from a magazine article. The system itself is very simple but has been a real time saver for me.
Once each week, I go down the aisles of breeding hutches and study each hutch card carefully in turn. The does that will require re-breeding during the next week will get a purple or dark blue plastic clothes pin snapped on the hutch front. Those that will need a nest box this week get a red pin and those that require any kind of medication or treatment get a green pin. Those that will need extra feed, such as calf manna, etc. get a yellow pin. The rabbits that should have their feed reduced get a clear or white pin, another color or combination of colors may be used for weaning and culling litters. From there you may go on and on what-^B ever your individual circumstances re-^^ quire.
This can be made to work especially well where the regular caretaker is gone from home, sick or late getting home and you have to call upon someone else to do the chores. You can immediately notice the hutches that need attention by noticing the colored pins on the hutches.
RABBITS RECOGNIZED IN PENNSYLVANIA
Wilbur Starr, reports that on August 9, 1965, Governor Scranton, of Pennsylvania issued a directive that recognizes rabbits as a farm animal. Therefore, the State Agriculture Department will pay V2 of all premiums, plus incurring the fees and expenses including judges at all Pennsylvania Fairs.
new ENGLAND SHOW CIRCUIT
For many years the New England area had problems of overlapping shows and the problem of competitive shows on the same dates. In some cases these shows were only a few miles apart. Several years ago some of the more far sighted rabbit breeders developed the New England Show Circuit which was designed to reduce this problem. It has been a most successful venture and a model that other regions might well attempt to copy.
All New England rabbit clubs are eligible to join and at this writing, virtually all are members. All shows are to be sanctioned by the Circuit and a fee of 10 cents per rabbit is sent to the Circuit Treasurer following every show. At the end of the year this money goes to buy trophies and for prize money for the top exhibitors in the many breeds.
The Show Circuit holds one special uncheon meeting each year for all breeders in New England. Club delegates may meet more often at shows during the year. Each local rabbit club has one delegate and one vote with the Show Circuit. The delegates allocate the show dates
DISPLAY
ADVERTISING
Copy deadline 15th of month preceding month of issue: Feb. 15, Apr. 15, June 15, Aug. 15, Oct. 15, Dec. 15. On annual contract deduct 10% from the rates listed below. Deduct additional 5% for cash with copy. This helps cut down our bookkeeping.
Send Advertising copy and payments direct to:
Managing Editor, E. T. Toebbe ARBA Bulletin 7400 Smyrna Road Louisville, Ky. 40228
Please make checks payable to ARBA Bulletin.
RATES
Vh Page vertical or horizontal.. .$ 14.00 Va Page vertical or horizontal . .. 23.00
Vz Page vertical or horizontal . . . 45.00
Full Inside Page ................ 87.50
Inside Cover Pages .............. 100.00
Type Page Size: 5'' x 7%"
and with very few exceptions the Circuit has eliminated the problem of overlapping and duplication. A good part of the credit for the success of the Show Circuit goes to George Smith. President, and Richard Tomazewski, Secretary. Both have the respect of the breeders and have worked hard at making it go. If all breeders are willing to bend and compromise a bit the Show Circuit idea reduces many of the show problems. It also provides a vehicle for having regional trophies and prizes.
SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA YOUTH SHOW
The Council of California ARBA Clubs, Southern Area, will hold an All Youth Show at Pomona. Calif., Sunday. April 3. Lyman Nelson will serve as General Supt.; Elmer Paquette, Secretary; Ron Gilbertson, Asst. Supt.; Pete Schnetzler is Specials Chairman; Orlan Onkst and Roscoe Schott, the Official Judges.
It is hoped, this will be the largest youth show held anywhere this year. Pete Schnetzler will do all in his power to get more specials than have ever been offered at any youth show, other than the National Convention. There will also be a Youth Contest, the winner to compete in State Contest later in the month.
TEXAS STATE RBA SHOWS BIG GAIN
Myrtle Geddes, secretary J. F. Butler, president
Our Secretary informs me we have gained several new clubs and an additional increase of 75 members. This means we are going into 1966 with the largest TRBA Club in our history. This is one of the finest things to have happened to our association and it also shows that more people are becoming interested in the raising of rabbits.
With the working membership we have now and the help of the officers and directors there is no reason why in January 1967 we can not show more of an increase than we did this year.
Our Year Book is at the press and should be delivered soon, if by some chance you don’t receive one by Mar. 15th notify our Secretary or Editor and we will see that you get one.
The State Show is in the making and from the looks of things we are going to have a nice one, with the markings of a large entry plus a vast attendance with a very nice youth show combined.
So all you breeders start grooming those good ones and have them ready for one of the best shows Texas ever had.
Page Nineteen
EASTERN HOLDS BANQUET
AWARDS LIFE MEMBERSHIPS AND 1965 SWEEPSTAKES TROPHIES
The Eastern Convention Banquet was attended by 130, this was 20 more than had been anticipated. W. J. Snyder, motioned that all Eastern Charter members with 25 years membership and service be granted Life Membership. John Tate and A1 Woehr were so honored.
Results of Eastern 1965 sweepstakes series were announced.
1st Cranston Hgt. Rbty............3322
2nd Bill Thompson .............2980
3rd W. B. Dillard ................2640
4th Earls Rbty. (Floyd) ..........2580
5th Himmelberger’s Rbty...........2447
6th R. E. Merchant .............2207
7th Floyd Tobias .................2180
8th Wallace Boyd .................2088
9th J. Milton Hood .............1290
10th Bob Rome.....................1260
11th Ken Smith ...................1178
12th Marker’s Rbty................1127
13th Lafayett Rbty................1093
A CAVY BREEDER'S LETTER TO SANTA CLAUS
Dear Santa,
At a time of the year when most of your letters are in request of toys, my letter is somewhat different. This past year in Ohio cavies have become quite popular.
I know the North Pole is no place in which to raise cavies, but I know quite a few non believers of you, who would be converted, if they were to find a prize winning young one in their coop Christmas morning.
There might not be any cookies and milk in the cavy barns, but I believe you could find hay, grain, and lettuce for your reindeer. While they refuel, you can look over the pride and joys of the breeders you stop to see. You might even be able to acquire a young one for that little boy who has had his nose pressed against the Pet Shop window.
Be watching for you Christmas Eve.
An Old Cavy Breeder still young at heart.
NEWS ROUNDUP
BITS FROM HERE AND THERE
Illness, transfers, and other reasons have caused some changes to be made in the organizational structure of the ARBA.
Dan Law is unable to serve in Oregon; Earl Hord replaces Andy Diamond, Colorado; R. E. Pfadt, will be transferred from Utah; Mrs. Ben Tryggestad replaces Arnold Johnson, Minn.; G. A. Burke, re-
Page Twenty
places Horace Taylor, Ohio; Emile Rondeau replaces Anthony Pisanelli, Vermont: T. L. Owen, Oklahoma and Robert Hickman, Mississippi will be unable to serve this year. Phil Lohman, 11800 W. Howard Ave., Greenfield, Wisconsin 53228 is Chairman of Commercial Committee.
State Agent Jess Williams, Arizona reports local agents have been selected in each club of Arizona. Cactus RBA had 352 entries for January 30th show.
Polish Rabbit Club, secretary, Charles A. Henry, Saugus, Mass., was installed as Commander of World War I Veterans Barracks in his city.
Candidates for office of ARBA, secure nominating petition blanks from secretary James Blyth, 4323 Murray Ave., Pittsburgh 17, Pa. Petitions complete with signatures of 25 ARBA members must be received by secretary Blyth by June 1, 1966. Ballots will be mailed July 15, 1966 and must be returned by August 15, 1966.
Keith Forbush, 25834 Avondale, Inkster, Michigan chairman of Resolution Committee must receive Resolutions to be acted upon at Louisville Convention soon as possible. In no event, later than July 17th. Signatures of 25 ARBA members are required. Other members of Resolution Committee, Jack Boughton, Marshall Hazard, H. E. Judkins.
State Agent Charles Wade, Arkansas has prepared and distributed material to ARBA members and breeders of Arkansas.
Mrs. Dolores Breckenridge, Youth secretary has new address—1487 Cole Road, Columbus, Ohio. 43228. Youth Division sanction requests $1.50 and Youth Membership applications with $1.50 all go to Mrs. Breckenridge. Youth member Sher-ida Neiman, appeared on panel at Indiana Rabbit School, Purdue Univ., Lafayette, Indiana, January 22nd. Let us all help the Youth in helping themselves.
CONTACT THE RETIRED
To contact the retired persons in any city or locality takes individual effort peculiar to the area involved. However, almost all cities newspapers will print at various times the list of newly retired persons from government agencies including the post office, they print notices of retirement of all types of private industry workers, teachers and others. It is these people and at the exact time of their new found retirement, that it is advisable to send them valuable rabbit literature and information, always followed by a personal welcome and invitation to visit your rabbitry. If we follow this procedure, these newly retired persons will not fall victim to one of the vicious false rabbit promoters over the country.
DUBBELL WORKS FOR GRANT-IN-AID
RABBIT RESEARCH AT ARKANSAS UNIV.
Bob Dubbell, manager of Pel-Freeze Rabbit Meat Inc., Rogers, Arkansas reports that wide support is being given to his efforts, petition wise, in support of research project at University of Arkansas.
Various persons of his company, including the driver-buyers take along a copy of the petition and after reading this, the rabbit producer is asked to affix his signature in support. Mr. Dubbell, reports that over 600 signatures were obtained in the first 9 days.
An expected sign up of over 1000 persons is expected within a two week period. Copies of petition and signatures thereto will then be prepared and mailed |to every senator and representative in the 4-state area of Missouri, Kansas, Oklahoma and Arkansas. Producers in Texas and Louisiana marketing thru the Pel-Freez plant are also supporting this venture. Mr. Dubbell, plans to be in Washington, D.C. in March.
A copy of the petition as circulated by
Pel-Freez is included as part of the Bulletin. This sample petition can well be used as guide in the preparation of similar efforts by interested groups throughout the U.S. The grant in aid program of the government is usually in the amounts of $50,000 and as such would serve a purpose in those states where needed. This effort in many parts of the country would further serve to remind congressional representatives throughout the U. S. of the importance of rabbits as a food, as a basic laboratory and pathological animal. The rabbit also fits in handsomely with the anti-poverty programs.
Bill Molen, and co-workers in Kansas and surrounding area have been working over 3 years for the establishment of a joint venture U.S. & Kansas state staffed and financed Rabbit Experiment Station. Progress is slow but progressing. An experiment station is sorely needed. Progress of this effort and the solicitation of help will be reported monthly.
A Petition To The Congress Oi The United States Requesting A Grant In Aid To The University Of Arkansas For A Domestic Rabbit Research Program
WHEREAS, the U. S. Dept, of Agriculture formerly conducted a rabbit experiment station at Fontana, Calif, for the benefit of the several hundred thousand domestic rabbit producers of the United States, and WHEREAS, the Fontana station has now been closed due to the elimination of certain USDA fur animal research programs, land
^WHEREAS, domestic rabbits have been misclassified for many years as a fur animal instead of properly being classified as a meat animal and a medical research animal, and
WHEREAS, domestic rabbits are one of the most efficient converters of grain and roughage into high quality meat, which is in growing demand by both the civilian and military markets in the U. S. as well as by new markets in foreign countries, and
WHEREAS, the nations expanded medical research efforts are demanding higher quality and healthier rabbits for research animals in ever expanding numbers, and WHEREAS, the domestic rabbit producers of the nation are vitally in need of additional and continuing research on rabbit diseases and the use of modern medicines in the treatment of diseases, rabbit nutrition, rabbit genetics, rabbit housing
and environment, and rabbit management, to help meet the growing demand for more meat and research animals, and WHEREAS, this type of rabbit research is of benefit to rabbit producers and medical researchers in all 50 states of the nation, and an adequate research program is not now available from any other source,
BE IT THEREFORE RESOLVED, that the Congress of the United States be requested to approve a grant in aid to the University of Arkansas, but not limited thereto, to help finance domestic rabbit research in one or more phases of rabbit production as above listed.
The University of Arkansas is located in the center of the nation, and also in the center of the nation’s largest and fastest developing area of domestic rabbit production. All research conducted at Fayetteville, Arkansas will benefit rabbit producers and medical researchers in all 50 states. Excellent research facilities are available in the University’s recently completed animal science building. Personnel has been added to the animal science staff, so the University is now in a position to undertake a very substantial rabbit research program.
Page Twenty-one
The University of Arkansas is willing to conduct rabbit research and has prepared a program for presentation to the U. S. Dept, of Agriculture. The program can be put into operation only by a grant in aid from the USDA, using funds that are normally made available to Land Grant Colleges and Universities for such needed and worthy projects.
THEREFORE BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that the rabbit producers who have signed this petition request the Con-
gress of the United States to give early recognition to the need for such rabbit research, to admit the justification of their request for this assistance, and to approve the establishment of this new rabbit research program to be conducted at the State level with financial assistance from the U. S. Dept, of Agriculture.
The undersigned rabbit producers hereby respectfully request the Congress of the United States to give its approval of this petition early in 1966.
FOR SALE
Always buy breeding stock from members of the ARBA. There is one near you and it’s best to see what you’re buying. Otherwise make use of our Judges and Registrars about the purchasing of stock. Reliable breeders will supply you with good healthy stock. Please promote all advertisers in ARBA publications. They are our friends and supporters.
CALIFORNIANS—good quality, pedigreed and registered. Prices and information on request. Always a few good ones for sale. Duane Shrader & Sons, 625 S 51st St., Lincoln, Neb. 68510.
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
70 per word—one insertion
60 per word—two insertions
50 per word—five remaining 1966 issues
Cash, check or money order must accompany classified copy. Deadline 15th of month preceding month of issue. “Stock for Sale” advertising accepted only from members.
POLISH—Black, Blue-eyed White, Californian Satins. Write for prices. Breeze Hollow Rabbitry, RD #1, Box 37, Wellington, O. 44090.
BEVERENS—I have a few Blue Eyed White Beverens for sale this Spring. These are young healthy rabbits which can be used for showing or breeding this Show Season. Neal Wilds, Warsaw, O. 43844.
SANDY FLEMISH GIANTS—Good quality stock available. Good type, size and production. Pedigreed. Mansfield’s Giant Rabbits, 1004 S. Garden Ave., Stockton, Calif. 95205.
“ROTHS VILLE DUTCH” — Home of Champions. Black, Blue, Chocolate. Pictured in the 1966 ARBA Official Guide Book. Pedigreed junior, showmarked, foundation trios $12.00. Satisfaction guaranteed. Jack Messner, Box 267A, Roths-ville, Penn.
“ROTHSVILLE GOLDEN PALOMINOS” —America’s new breed. Pictured in the 1966 ARBA Official Guide Book. Pedigreed junior foundation trios $12.00. Satisfaction guaranteed. Jack Messner, Box 267A, Rothsville, Penn.
Page Twenty-two
FLEMISH GIANTS—All colors. Sandys of all ages. Colors limited. Andrews Circle “A” Rabbitry, Rt. $3, Newark, O. 43055.
“FINE-X” (reg.) — The Original Self-Cleaning Feeder. Sifts out “fines”, stops wasting feed, keeps pellets palatable, saves hours of work. Size 11^”, heavy galvanized steel, riveted not spot-welded.
New low prices: 1 sample $1.90, 6-$9.75,^^A 12-$17.50, shipped prepaid insured. You^l^F save up to $4.00/dozen over fob quotations. Quantity discounts. Dealers invited.
Free literature. Ozark Enterprises, Willard 8, Mo.
“HOW TO START A COMMERCIAL RABBITRY”—This book is written by and based on the actual experience of a successful operator of a 1000 hole commercial rabbitry. A great help for any rabbit raiser—a must for the beginner. Covers equipment and how to build it, how to select commercial breeds, covers feeds, feeding and feed cost, how to handle rabbits, breed, wean, sex, market, keep records, etc. Numerous drawings and pictures makes every subject easy to understand. Price $2.50, postage paid. Ozark Enterprises, Willard 8, Mo.
ARBA
The World's Largest Organization Of Rabbit Breeders — Built Upon Integrity and Service
ARBA
THE AMERICAN RABBIT BREEDERS ASSOCIATION, INC.
Breeder and Show Room Supplies
ARBA Emblems
Coat Lapel Pins—member (Bronze) . ..........................ea. $1.25
5 to 10 Year (Sterling Silver) ea. 2.25
10 to 25 Year (10K Gold) ....................ea. 5.00
Over 25 Years (10K Gold) ....................ea. 5.00
Decals for Windshields, etc. (3 colors) ....................ea. .25
6 for 1.00
Back Patches for Show Coats ................................ea. 2.25
Sleeve Patches for Show Coats ...............................ea. 1.25
Rubber Stamp ...............................................ea. 1.50
Electro (3}4") ..............1.50 Large (\lA“) ................ 1.75
New Book of Standards (1966-1970)
Paper Cover (soft) .......$2.00 Cloth Cover (hard) ............... 3.00
Recipe Folders ........................
Pedigree Books (50 blanks) ..................
Judging Report Book (for Show Secretaries)
* logan Electro ..................................
Slogan Rubber Stamp (use it on everything)
per 100 1.00
......... 1.50
... . 1.50
......... 1.50
1.50
All Items Ottered are Sent Postpaid Add Sales Tax lor Illinois 4%, Penn. 5%
THE AMERICAN RABBIT BREEDERS ASSOCIATION, INC.
4323 Murray Avenue Pittsburgh, Penna. 15217
Page Twenty-three

Original Format

Bound magazine