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American Rabbit Breeders Association

ARBA Bulletin 1958 Vol. 1, No. 6 – June-July
Collection: 1958 ARBA Bulletins

Title

ARBA Bulletin 1958 Vol. 1, No. 6 – June-July

Subject

ARBA member periodicals

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Creator

American Rabbit Breeders Association

Publisher

American Rabbit Breeders Association

Date

1958

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Citation
American Rabbit Breeders Association, “ARBA Bulletin 1958 Vol. 1, No. 6 – June-July,” ARBA Digital Library, accessed July 16, 2024, https://arbalibrary.org/item/14.
Text

THE VOICE OF THE AMERICAN RABBIT BREEDERS ASSOCIATION
RABBIT KEEPING IN ENGLAND
IN 1861 Taken From
MRS BEETON'S BOOK OF HOUSEHOLD MANAGEMENT (Contributed by R. C. Weston)
THE RABBIT HOUSE Rabbit keeping is generally practiced by a few individuals in almost every town, and by a few in almost every part of the country. Forty years ago, there were in the metropolis one or two considerable feeders, who according to report, kept from 1,500 to 2,000 breeding does.
These large establishments, however, have ceased to exist, and London receives the supply of tame as well as wild rabbits, chiefly from the country. Where they are kept, however, the rabbit house should be placed upon a dry foundation and be well ventilated. Exposure to rain, whether externally or internally, is fatal to rabbits, which like sheep, are liable to the rot, springing from the same causes. Thorough ventilation and good air are indispensable where many rabbits are kept, or they will neither prosper nor remain healthy for any length of time. A thorough draught or passage for the air is, therefore absolutely necessary, and should be so contrived as to be checked in cold or wet weather, by the closing or shutting of opposite doors or windows.
ABOVE. Rabbit Schools Offer Breeders An Opportunity To Visit Rabbitries And See The Latest In Rabbitry Equipment In Use. Photo Courtesy Small Stock Magazine
BELOW. An Illustration Of What Has Been Called “THE WORLD’S LARGEST RABBIT FARM.” Consisting Of Sixty Buildings, At One Time 50,000 Rabbits Were Housed Here. Here As In England Such Large Rabbitries Have Ceased To Exist.
ARBA
An American Rabbit Breeder's Association Publication June Third - 1958 Edition July
CIRCULATION THIS ISSUE 8,000 COPIES
VOLUME ONE
NUMBER SIX
ARBA
JUNE-JULY, 1958
A. R. B. A. OFFICIAL BULLETIN
PAGE TWO
FEHR'S Rabbit Necessities
TATTOO OUTFIT—
(Complete with Ink) ......... 75c
DISINFECTANT—(Makes 3 Gallons) 60c LIQUID SULPHO—A Conditioner .. 60c
EAR CANKER REMEDY ............. 60c
COLD REMEDY -One of the Best .. 60c ABOVE $3.15 VALUE—$2.50 POSTPAID RABBIT DISEASES—The Cause. Preven-tion and Cure—HAVE IT HANDY . 25c RAISING SMALL STOCK—Describing 25 Breeds of Rabbits-Cavies-Hamsters-
Chinchillas ................. 25c
RAISING RABBITS FOR PROFIT—For The Beginner, or Experienced Breeder
48 pages..................... 50c
RABBIT HUTCHES—Self Cleaning, 31 Actual Photographs Shows How to
Build ....................... 50c
I CHOSE RABBITS—Its Different. Teaches Successful Methods. How to Start,
Continue, Market. 96 Pages .$1.00
DOMESTIC RABBIT PRODUCTION By Geo. S. Templeton, Director. U. S. Rabbit Experiment Station. 13 Chapters 100 Subjects—201 Separate Items. Best Rabbit Book Published.
PRICE $3.50 POSTPAID — FREE Rabbitry Supply CATALOG —
JNO. FEHR
1302 Woodlawn Ave. Indianapolis. Ind.
Dr. Max R. Andrews
Sandy Flemish New Zealand White
1117½ S. Clinton Street FORT WAYNE, IND.
WESTON'S DEPENDABLE AND PROVEN
Pet Tattoo
OUTFIT
Let this famous brand be your
guide to quality
Kit contains special marking ink, dies (¼" and ⅜") plus NEW tong with concealed spring to prevent pinching; deeper throat for use from any angle; Digits changed ‘individually from front. $4.00 and up according to numbers or letters wanted.
See your dealer or
Send for FREE Illustrated Price Folder
WESTON MFG. & SUPPLY CO
1923 Speer, Delivery 4, Colo.
where to find
PURINA RABBIT CHOW
and good service
The Store with the Checkerboard Sign ... that’s headquarters for rabbit raisers across the country. They make it headquarters because it’s where they get Purina Rabbit Chow and the many “extras” that are available to folks who feed from the Checkerboard Bag.
“Extras” like sales and promotional helps; like Rabbit Chow’s ability to help develop top quality fryers and show stock . . . plus the benefits of Purina’s years of research on feeding rabbits for profit.
So make it your headquarters, too... THE STORE WITH THE CHECKERBOARD SIGN.
RALSTON PURINA COMPANY • St. Louis 2, Mo.
OWENS TROPHIES
— (Your Best Buy —
AVAILABLE FROM YOUR LOCAL DEALER OR CLUB REPRESENTATIVE. IF YOUR CLUB DOES NOT HAVE A REPRESENTATIVE WRITE FOR CATALOG AND SPECIAL PRICES.
R. S. OWENS & CO.
4939 N. ELSTON AVE. - CHICAGO 30, ILL.
JUNE-JULY, 1958
A. R. B. A. OFFICIAL BULLETIN
PAGE THREE
“HAVE A GOOD RABBIT CLUB"
As this is written, I have completed sixteen months of my tenure as President of the American Rabbit Breeders Association. It has been a Rich and Rewarding experience. The first twelve months were spent getting the Important Committees appointed, and working as they should. There was the necessity of getting back together Clubs and Associations that had split mostly because of misunderstandings among good friends. This was no job for a man that likes to sit down.
When I think of the many Clubs, that I visited during my tenure as President, it brings up the next question “WHAT MAKES A GOOD RABBIT CLUB?”, and I think I have seen enough Clubs, good, bad and indifferent, to reasonably answer this question.
The difference between a good Rabbit Club and a Mediocre one is simply the difference in morale.
I am sure we all know what morale means. In wartime its the spirit which enables a soldier to fight on in the face of hardship and danger; in time of peace it is the willingness to cooperate for the common good and to work in harmony on the job on hand. If this is the definition of morale, it must be the definition of a good Rabbit Club.
We say that a certain Club or Association—our own perhaps—has high morale. Its members are convinced that they work for the best Club in ARBA; they enjoy the fellowship of those with whom they are working; they are proud of their service to their fellow Breeders. You can’t beat a Club like that. When the competition gets tough and the members are called upon for extra effort, they will come through because this is a matter of personal pride. Our leaders call it— a wonderful glow of enthusiasm, devotion and jealous regard for the honor of the group.
Good morale doesn’t just happen. Invariably the Rabbit Clubs that have officers who are good leaders—officers who can coordinate the little things and big task of Raising Rabbits and inspire their members to follow through until they can say “My Job Is Well Done.”
Believe me, you do not have to be
a Genius to Inspire the Breeders in your Club. They join because they like Rabbits, enjoy the good fellowship and have respect for the other Breeders ideas. They elect Club Presidents, Secretaries or Directors because they like good leadership. The job isn’t so much to crank them up as it is to keep them interested at all times.
There is just a little difference, I’ll admit, between the job of President and that of any member. All you can promise your members are opportunities for service, the handclasp of fellowship for a job well done. You aren’t in position to say “Do it — or else”. Fact is you don’t need to.
The responsibility of any Club officer is to encourage cooperation and team work, and that is not difficult because the members in your Club are eager, willing and anxious to give them to you. Cooperation has been called a voluntary thing, a two way street, a way of living in which people work together to get something done. Teamwork is simply the spirit of the members, organized by a leader who gives each one the task for which he is best suited, and then lets that Breeder know, every moment until
the project is finished, how important his contribution is to the success of his Club. No Breeder pooped out because of too much work. The members who stand around, idle, feeling unneeded and unwanted turn into unhappy Rabbit Breeders.
It is a great thrill to belong to a group of hard workers, which have high morale. You walk straighter because you belong to it—and pretty soon you will find yourself thinking and planning how to make your Club even better, and you aren’t satisfied with anything but the best. High morale pays off as bigger projects are attempted and bigger goals are attained, and those in turn bring greater enthusiasm and raise sights on a higher target, and pretty soon you’ve got a Club that can't be stopped.
I can guarantee the members, of such a Club, one more compensation. High morale cannot be contained; it spreads outward from your Club in waves of good will. The Breeder who is happy with his Club and happy with his leaders and happy with his fellow Rabbit Breeders will spread the contentment throughout his community, and win friends for our cause, and you will have such a strong force for public relations that pride of membership will be unequaled.
Yes, the difference between a good Rabbit Club and an ordinary one is cooperation for the common good, it is working together for the honor of the group.
THIS IS THE SPIRIT OF AMERICAN RABBIT BREEDERS ASSOCIATION.
Sincerely yours,
BIOGRAPHY
F. W. SEVERANCE Started his Rabbit Raising Enterprise about 31 years ago. And says, “When I was a young fellow I was looking for something to get into that would make me a few extra dollars. Was attracted by an advertisement that said “Raise Rabbits, We Buy All You Raise.” In fact there were several such advertisements in the magazine that I subscribed for at that time. But Ed Stahl’s Outdoor Enterprise appealed to me most after receiving a very attractive catalogue I sent for.
At that time I knew absolutely nothing about raising rabbits. Upon arrival of these rabbits I brought them home, and as I had not completed my hutches, I put the three New Zealand Whites in one small dog house and the trio of Chins in another. The next morning when I went down to feed these rabbits, they had been fighting during the night and there was fur scattered all over the dog houses. I readily saw that I had to get the hutches completed, and then I put them in separate hutches. I was the first one that I know of in this section that had any rabbits.
I started this out just as a hobby. Then I had a doctor friend that started buying lab does, and this spread out into a good sized business, so that now I am retired it takes my full time. I now sell show stock, breeding stock, meat stock and laboratory stock. I sell lab stock to 7 hospitals, several doctors, clinics, and to the University of Tennessee Biology Dept. I also sell guinea pigs to these customers.”
F. W. Severance
PRESIDENT DICK F. PARKER 4901 South Fifth Avp. Birmingham 6, Ala.
FRED R. APPLEGATE 1707 E. Carpenter St. Springfield. Ill.
VICE PRESIDENT JOHN C. FEHR 1302 Woodlawn Ave. Indianapolis 3, Ind.
ARBA
OFFICERS
DIRECTORS
SECRETARY TREASURER
JAMES BLYTH DR. MAX R. ANDREWS 4323 Murray Avenue 1117½ So. Clinton
Pittsburgh 17. Pa. Ft. Wayne 2, Ind.
VERN ASHTON 1626 Oakland Parkway Lima. Ohio
BENNY F. HILL 1603 N. Roberts Amarillo. Texas
CARL P. KROBOTH 107 Westwood Dr. Lexington, Ky.
J. CYRIL LOWIT Route 2. Box 160 Troutdale, Dreg.
ELLIS W. MURRAY 1714 West 106th St. Los Angeles 47. Calif.
HARRY HURLBURT OSCAR F. SCHULTZE EDWARD H. STAHL Bainbridge. N. Y. Westport Avenue Hickman Mills. Mo.
Norwalk. Conn.
A Personal Message
from the President
President.
JUNE-JULY, 1958
A. R. B. A. OFFICIAL BULLETIN
PAGE FOUR
OFFlCIAL BULLETIN
PUBLISHED BY AMERICAN
RABBIT BREEDERS ASSOCIATION 4323 Murray Ave., Pittsburgh 17, Pa.
OBJECTS
“To maintain a registration and recording system — afford memberships to persons interested in breeding and marketing of rabbits and allied products — promote and conduct public and private exhibitions — provide judging systems — license its official judges and registrars — make and revise official standards — organize and assist local, County and state associations and specialty clubs — maintain information bureaus — furnish at cost, bulletins, guide books, booklets, posters, placards, supplies and textbooks to members and to the public — investigate markets — assist in securing legislation and publicity — hold annual conventions and meetings of its members and board of directors.
MEMBERSHIP FEE $3.00 PER YEAR
WANTED - Items Of Interest
Please observe the following when contributing articles.
1. Keep them short.
2. Must be on general interest.
3. Name of writer must appear with all articles.
4. Give sources of information if quoting.
5. Must positively be exclusive for this publication.
ADDRESS All comments, suggestions and articles pertaining to this bulletin to: Edw. H. Stahl,
Hickman Mills 34, Missouri
ADDRESS All communications concerning business matters, advertising, renewals, new membership applications, non-receipt of bulletin, changes of address, etc., to: James Blyth, Secretary,
4323-BN Murray Ave., Pittsburgh, Pa.
Advertising Rates
1 Inch, Judges & Registrars only $ 3.50
2 Inches — Single or double col. $ 7.00
3 Inches ” ” ” ” $10.50
4 Inches ’’ ” ” ” $14.00
6 Inches ” ” ” ” $21.00
¼ page, 3 3/4x4 3/4 inches $23.50
¾ page, 4¾x7¼ inches ......... $46.50
Full page, 7¼x9¾ inches ...... $90.00
SPECIAL POSITION INSIDE COVER PAGES $100.00
Closing Date Next Edition
JULY 1, 1958
JAMES BLYTH, Secretary 4323-BN Murray Avenue Pittsburgh 17, Pa.
EDITORIAL COMMENT
OSCAR F. SCHULTZE
THE COMMERCIAL BREEDER LET'S FACE IT
First of all, where does the Commercial Breeder buy his foundation herd? Let’s face it—he usually buys from the Show Rabbit Breeder.
Now, where does the Show Rabbit Breeder sell his culls and surplus fryers? Let’s face it again—If the Show Breeder is fortunate enough to have a Commercial Breeder in his vicinity, he takes his surplus fryers to him and receives a fair price for them.
Last, and by all means the most important, who is largely responsible for placing the domestic rabbit before the public? Here is a fact that we should face squarely—the Commercial Man has used several methods of advertising to place the domestic rabbit before the public. To mention a few; Radio, T.V., and in the newspapers, but by far the most effective, he has placed an attractively packaged and cut up fryer in the show cases of our grocery stores.
Fellow Show Rabbit Breeders, let’s face the facts—we need these Commercial Breeders. They are as important to the Domestic Rabbit Industry as we are. Let’s share the “Spot-Lite” with these folks who raise rabbits commercially.
The above appeared in a recent issue of Midwest Rabbit News, Published by The Heart Of America Rabbit Raisers Association of Kansas City, Mo. under the title, THE TIME HAS COME TO FACE THE FACTS.
To many of us the Commercial Breeder is one who has from 100 to 600 breeding does and devotes his full time to producing fryers for the market. In my opinion this is wrong, as I claim that any breeder who sells a rabbit, be it a fryer or a breeder is a commercial breeder. Even though he raises rabbits for himself alone and eats all his fryers that man is a commercial man.
Just because a breeder shows his stock at the show does not mean that he is strictly a Fancier, as no doubt he
has a bunch at home that will go to
the processor.
In traveling around to the shows this has been brought to me more forcibly than ever, when you hear some exhibitor trying to buy one or two hundred fryers to fill out his orders.
At a recent show that I attended, there were two exhibitors who are known to have good stock, in fact in the White New Zealand classes one of them won four firsts and the others won two firsts. In talking with the man who won four firsts all he could talk about was his customers for rabbit meat and the one who won two firsts was asking all the breeders at the show to send him all the fryers they had. It is men like these two who are the most successful breeders. They are breeding rabbits as close to the standard as possible, and in doing so they get some young that will be sold as future breeders and the rest are sold for fryers. This is my idea of the way to make money in the rabbit business.
In breeding rabbits myself, I want my stock to be as near the standard as it is possible to get them. All I ask of a doe is that she raise four litters a year averaging eight to the litter that will weigh four pounds each at eight weeks of age. If you have a number of does like this you will make a worth while profit.
Our greatest fault in the Rabbit Business is, we do not have enough fryers. Many of us will sell one hundred fryers and then we are out of business for a month. No butcher likes to offer an article for sale that he cannot have on hand at all times. For that reason many a customer has quit handling rabbits—let us raise more rabbits, especially in localities where the demand exceeds the supply.
Some of you may say I have rambled all over the lot in this article, let me assure you it is the way I feel.
OUR MEMBERSHIP DRIVES
JANUARY 1 TO APRIL 30, 1958
WANTED Additional Individuals, Firms, Clubs and Associations to take part in this Drive. 25,000 Additional Membership Application Blanks Are Ready for distribution. Get your supply from Secretary James Blyth.
BY INDIVIDUALS AND FIRMS
Edward H. Stahl, Mo. 27
Mary Zampatti, Calif. 13
A. F. Valouch, Okla. 11
Wm. Herdlinger, Mo. 9
John C. Fehr, Ind. 8
E. R. Parks, Ariz. 7
Bob Madsen, Ill.................... 7
Tommy Andrew, Pa. 7
Melvin Behrens, N. Y. 6
Beacon Milling Co., N. Y. 5
BY LOCAL CLUBS AND ASSOCIATIONS
Clarinda R.B.A., Iowa 23
South County R.B.A., Tex. 8
Cal-Bra Hill R.B.A., Mich. 7
York Co. R.B.A., Pa. 7
Columbus R.B.A., Miss. 7
Springfield R.B.A., Ohio 7
B.C.R.B.A., Canada 6
Des Moines R.B.A., Iowa 6
Goshen R.B.A., Ind. 6
GET READY for this year's outstanding event
THE 35TH ANNUAL A.R.B.A. CONVENTION, SPRINGFIELD, ILL.
LOCAL CLUB PROGRAM SUGGESTIONS
Over the United States and Canada, we have well over 300 local associations which are chartered with the American. Some of these locals are very strong in membership and activity, others have small memberships and have a hard time carrying on the work or duties of a local.
Locals are in direct contact with our membership in their locality. Many things can best be explained in person than by books or letter writing, therefore, the local serves a very worthy purpose in our setup.
Many people who are active in our locals atre new people to the rabbit industry and fancy. These people want to do a good job, but in some cases lack the information needed to build up the local and keep the membership interested.
Too many of our locals continually talk shows while there is a place for this talk, too much time and effort can be used in this direction. Most people join a local to find out more about rabbit raising and its many branches. Some want to know about marketing rabbits. Others want to know about marketing rabbits. Others want to know about hutch construction or about breeding methods. Therefore, when so many meetings are devoted to shows and the planning of them, members will lose interest and fall by the wayside. This not only effects the local but the American as well. Therefore, every local should set up an educational program. This program should be set up well ahead of the meetings. If you have no one in your local who qualifies to talk on different subjects, you should take one of the trade magazines. There are many very educational articles in them. You will be able to find articles on most any subject. Or you might take the Official Guide Book or the Bulletin. Have one of your members select an article and read it at your meeing. Then have each and every member discuss it. Some no doubt will agree with the article, while others will disagree. This will bring out a lively discussion which will be helpful to all. No one is too old or has too much experience that they cannot learn something from such a discussion. Some of your members may have a copy of George S. Templeton’s Book “Domestic Rabbit Production.” This book should be owned by every local to help its members. Templeton’s Book has most all the answers and would be a very good investment to every local. Problems of rabbit breeders thus could be brought up at
the local meetings and Templton’s Book could well be used as a text book. This is something we are sorely in need of and should bring out your members and keep them interested in your local as well as helping to make better rabbit raisers out of them.
Take a different subject each meeting. Put a question box in the back of the meeting room for members who will not ask a question on the floor but will write it down and place it in a box. These members fear their question will sound foolish, however, any honest question is not considered foolish but rather a person honestly seeking helpful information. By these discussions and using good articles as a text, your local will be helping all your members and thus bring about a better local club.
We here have three sets of the Rockland Technicolor Slides which you can borrow without cost. Show these at your local meeting. Discuss the various breeds which the pictures will show on the slides. Talk about the precessing slides and the one showing diseases. They are very educational and you can hold a picture until everyone gets a good look at it.
Several of the feed companies have films, slides and records which can be borrowed free. They too, have their field representatives who are people
well informed on rabbit husbandry. A letter to one of these feed concerns I am sure avail you with one of these field representatives as a speaker at your meeting. The A.R.B.A, has many well qualified speakers who at times may be in your district and would be glad to address your meeting.
The American’s Film “Fun, Fur & Profit” which has been making its rounds for several years is now becoming pretty well worn, however, should be available for some showings yet. This film has a rental charge of $7.50 per showings. It is a 16 m.m. in color with sound and takes approximately 30 minutes to show. This film is very educational and takes you from the nest bok to the ladies rabbit fur coat.
Meetings should be kept interesting and educational. Most local business can be handled in a very short time, thus the balance of the meeting should be devoted to educational features with some social period.
When a meeting has been adjourned, the members in attendance should start for home and not a few remain after the meeting to talk about those who have left, thus this can cause dis-sention in the club.
Show plans should be left to Show Committees and the general meeting should not be bored with the discussion on shows at most all meetings.
I am sure if the suggestions mentioned are followed closely, we will have better meetings and thus have better attendance, better informed members, and most of all the rabbit industry’s progress will be greater in your area. Why not give it a try!
Secretary
Meet Me
AT THE
35th
A. R. B. A. CONVENTION
SPONSORED BY THE
Illinois Rabbit Breeders Assn.

SPRINGFIELD
ILLINOIS
October 11-14
THE BIG EVENT OF 1958 — DON'T MISS IT-
Make Convention Time—Vacation Time
Don't Miss It
Make Hotel and Motel Reservations Early
Don't Miss It
Remember 1951. This One Is Likely To Top It
Don't Miss It
The Largest Gathering Of Rabbit Raisers Of The Year
Don't Miss It
Last But Not Last All Previous Convention Records Are Likely To Be Broke
LAST BUT NOT LEAST. ALL PREVIOUS CONVENTION RECORDS ARE LIKELY TO BE BROKEN.
-DON'T MISS IT-
JUNE-JULY, 1958
A. R. B. A. OFFICIAL BULLETIN
PAGE FIVE
Secretary's Message
By James Blyth
JUNE-JULY, 1958
A. R. B. A. OFFICIAL BULLETIN
PAGE SIX

FULL TIME BUSINESS OR WELL PAID HOBBY
Thousands of Raisers Needed to Meet the Tremendous Demand for MEAT—FUR— LABORATORY- BREEDING STOCK.
Illustrated Rook describing 25
Breeds, Breeding andCare. Markets.Etc.
Plus Bulletin. 25 cents. We Are Association of Breeders who want to see you start right AMERICAN RABBIT ASS'N., ARBA Bldg., Pittsburgh. Penna.
MEMBERS—1958 January to April Inclusive 389 Same period of 1957—226
THE BEGINNER
In The Beginner we have a very important person. It is the duty of the ARBA to see to it that such a person receives the kind of information he or she needs when venturing into the business of raising rabbits. Such information is available in the ARBA guide book, which not only presents the fundamental principles of rabbit raising, but makes it possible for the beginner and potential rabbit raiser, to contact breeders and local clubs nearby for some first hand information. Cost of membership is only $3.00. It is the best investment anyone can possibly make. See application blank on page 13.
rabbit concerns large and small spring up and flourish for a time and disappear. These concerns advertised extensively and by doing so did during the years of 1920 and to 1945 do much to keep things going. As we now look back, those of us who know what advertising really means there is the realization that when the ARBA started an advertising program of their own, those responsible did this one and only thing to keep this organization as a going concern. It is very fortunate indeed that we now have numerous breeders of rabbits who realize that it is possible to build a profitable spare time or full time rabbit business by advertising. Those who use the ARBA booklet as an advertising medium have found this to be correct, as well as those who use the bulletin and the reason is that the booklet finds its way into the hands of the beginners as does 2000 to 3000 copies of this bulletin each time it’s published.
James Bunt, Chairman THE A.R.B.A. BULLETIN
INFORMATION WANTED
The budget for national advertising for 1958 is $5500.00 of which $5395.02 has been contracted for in 30 of America’s leading Farm, Outdoor, Mechanics, etc., magazines. We now need the help of our members to check all magazines coming to their attention. If there are any that carry “Rabbits for Sale” advertising in which the ARBA advertisement does not appear let us know. You will be doing the ARBA and the industry a real service.
OUR MEMBERSHIP DRIVE FOR 1958
At the first of the year A.R.B.A. Secretary, James Blyth, sent a printed form and details of a separate membership drive for local clubs to all locals. Shortly after Mr. Blyth’s letter I (as Chairman of the Membership Drive Committee) followed with a personal letter addressed to the secretary of all locals asking that they prevail upon their club to enter the contest.
To date the response has been most favorable. I have received many replies to my letters from these locals stating that their clubs were joining the membership contest.
As you no doubt already know, when a club enters this contest it not only helps to build a stronger American but also adds dollars in the club treasury.
In addition to the 50ȼ for each membership (either new or renewal) the club sending in the most memberships during 1958 will receive a $25.00 cash prize, (cash awards will be given to the top ten) plus an immeasurable amount of free publicity through our official Bulletin.
If you have not already done so, won’t you enter this contest today? Mr. Blyth will be happy to provide you with plenty of combination local club and A.R.B.A, membership applications.
The results of both the individual and local club drive will appear in this and later issues of the Bulletin.
I would be most happy to hear from the clubs when they enter this contest.
Bill Herdlinger, Chairman
MEMBERS —1958 January to April Inclusive 598 Same period of 1957—503
All are aware of the fact that I have been in favor of publishing this bulletin as a means of keeping the members informed of the activities of this organization. Also about its financial status, what transpires at the meetings of the Board of Directors as well as general meeting of conventions, what transpires there, the adoptions and rejections of resolutions. This bulletin is the only means by which this information can reach all members. We must however bear in mind that this bulletin is more or less on a trial basis during this year. It is by no means an established feature, if it ever will be depends on a good many things of which a very clear check is being made which will be the tip off as to this bulletin’s future.
If I may do so, I would like to comment on the February-March edition. Considerable space was taken up by reports of meetings, the financial standing, committees, etc. All important features of course, still from what I can find out in reading correspondence, from committee members, etc., this issue is likely to give all our members some ideas of what future issues will be like, much depends on those who will supply the news, etc.
John C. Fehr, Chairman
ADVERTISING
The present is distinctly AN ADVERTISING AGE which the producer of rabbits now realizes. It makes no difference what we have to offer. Advertising regulates our habits, customs and mode of living. It establishes our wants, provides conveniences and comforts. It meets our every requirement and constantly suggests new ideas and modern methods necessary to stay in business and increases sales and profits.
My interest in rabbits goes back many years. In my time I have seen booms, and recessions. I have seen
DICK F. PARKER President, ARBA
NOW DEVOTING MY ENTIRE TIME
TO THE BUILDING OF A BIGGER AND BETTER
A. R. B. A.
Open For Show Judging Engagements JUDGE
DICK F. PARKER
4901 — 5th Avenue, So. Birmingham, Alabama
Know the Facts
OUR NEW ADVERTISEMENT
On the left appears our new display advertisement now appearing in a number of magazines including all the outdoor publications. There is being mailed now to all who inquire the Second 1957 Edition of the Beginners booklet, 190,000 copies printed, so far. In addition each inquiry will receive a copy of this bulletin. This entire effort is directed to The Beginner. New members by this effort arc, 1954-742, 1955-617, 1956-634, 1957-646.
JUNE-JULY, 1958
A. R. B. A. OFFICIAL BULLETIN
PAGE SEVEN
REPORT OF THE
Advertising and Promotion Committee American Rabbit Breeders Association, Inc. Fiscal Year
JULY 1, 1956 TO JUNE 30, 1957
NATIONAL ADVERTISING
(1957 Budget $4250.00)
PERIODICALS USED — Farm, Outdoor, Poultry, Mechanics, Etc.
Magazines
MEMBERSHIP DRIVE
COMBINING THE ABOVE SHOWS
Receipts Total $8643.57 Expense Total $6953.04. CREDIT TOTAL $1690.53.
ADVERTISING — Rabbit Magazines (1957 Budget $1250.00)
PUBLICATIONS — Small Stock Magazine, American Small Stock Farmer, National Rabbit Raiser, American Rabbit Journal. Total Expenditures for Advertising $1051.43.
NOTE—The above compiled from monthly tabulations and quarterly reports supplied by Secretary, James Blyth.
Edw. H. Stahl, Chairman
Small Stock Magazine
Gives You MORE For Your MONEY
Just Compare the contents
• MORE exclusive feature articles • MORE pictures
• MORE articles for the fancier • MORE show news
• MORE commercial news • MORE regular departments
• MORE ARBA news • MORE classified ads
• MORE Club news • MORE market information
Small Stock Magazine has MORE advertisers.................
.......because it has MORE readers
Small Stock Magazine
Box 8-Z 1 year, $2.00
2 years, $3.50
Lamoni, Iowa 3 years, $5.00
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
DECATUR, Ill. — Thomas E. Kana-kis of Little Rock, Ark., has joined the A. E. Staley Manufacturing Co. as sales supervisor of “Rockland Diets” for laboratory animals, according to an announcement by Lloyd A. Winslow, sales manager of the Decatur, Ill., corn and soybean processing concern’s Formula Feed Department.
Kanakis will supervise sales and distribution of the company’s full line of feeds specially formulated for exact uniformity and controlled-content feeding of rabbits, rats, mice, guinea pigs and monkeys in experimental laboratory work.
He will be stationed in Decatur.
Kanakis has been in feed sales work in the Southern states for several years, He was division manager with the Western Grain Co. of Birmingham, Ala., before joining Staley’s, and was with Vitality Mills. Inc., previously.
RABBITS IN RUSSIA
By Dr. Alfred de Castro
In this age of Sputniks, when the Russian scientific achievements in the field of rocketry have shaken our complacency, it may not come as a surprise to the American rabbit breeders to know that Soviet progress in the field of rabbit raising has been no less notable.
Firstly, according to an article published by the New York Herald Tribune, the Soviets have enlisted the prolific rabbit in a campaign to top the United States lead in meat production. Mr. Nikita S. Khruschev, the Soviet leader, was quoted as saying that rabbit meat is tasty and tender and that many people prefer it to chicken. Pravda, the Communist party newspaper, devoted a full page to extol the virtues of rabbits and urged the rural youth throughout the country to raise rabbits. Imagine the boost to our rabbit industry if President Eisenhower and all the major U. S. newspapers had done the same thing in this country!
However, the above is just part of the story. According to an article published in one of the leading French trade-journals, entitled “New Rabbit Breeds in the U.S.S.R.,” as far back as 1934 (no more recent statistics are available), there were about 7 million domestic rabbits in Russia from approximately 300,000 in 1914 and 900,000 in 1930. At present, most of the rabbits are raised by collective farms. Individual rabbit breeders are not yet organized, but it is estimated that there are about 1,200,000 of them. Insofar as rabbit breeds are concerned, for many years the most popular breed is the Giant Chinchillas (59%), followed by the Blue Viennas (28%), the White Giants and the Angoras although the latter seem to occupy now the second place. Other breeds are being tried such as the Rexes and new breeds have been created. One of these is the “Chin-chilla-Molotov,” with darker surface color than the ordinary one and weighing 12.6 lbs. at maturity. Another new breed is the “Tartar White,” developed from a cross between the Flemish and Angora rabbits, some weighing 14 lbs. at maturity and producing as much as 900 grms of wool per year.
RECEIPTS — CREDITS
Members—598 at $3.00 Each $1794.00
Booklets to Inquiries .. 2448.58
Orders—From Adv. in Booklet 120.00
Value of Letters (Inquiries) .. 50.49
Advertising—Sold in Booklet
First 1957 Edition 1017.50
RECEIPTS TOTAL $5430.57
EXPENDITURES — DEBITS
Advertising $3898.77
Mailing Booklets (Postage) .... 353.40
Sec’y Com. On Members Only 448.50
Printing—10,000 Booklets 900.00
Production Cost—Typing
Postage, Misc. 1957 and 1957
Editions of Booklet 112.22
EXPENSE TOTAL $5712.89
RECEIPTS TOTAL 5430.57
DEBIT $282.32
RECEIPTS — CREDITS
Members—1071 at $3.00 Each $3213.00
EXPENSE TOTAL 1240.15
CREDIT TOTAL $1972.85
EXPENDITURES — DEBITS
Sec’y Commission $803.25
Commission—Paid Mailers 374.20
Membership Blanks—10,000 62.70
EXPENSE TOTAL $1240.15
JUNE-JULY, 1958
A. R. B. A. OFFICIAL BULLETIN
PAGE EIGHT
TABULATIONS OF RESULTS OF QUESTIONAIRE SENT TO ALL A.R.B.A. MEMBERS
TABULATION OF STATES OF QUESTIONAIRE RETURNED
North Carolina 26
North Dakota 0
Ohio 149
Oklahoma 25
Oregon 18
Pennsylvania 95
Rhode Island 8
South Carolina 11
South Dakota 6
Tennessee 29
Texas 95
Utah 17
Vermont 11
Virginia 22
Washington 20
West Virginia 10
Wisconsin 43
Wyoming 3
States Unknown 2
Number questionaires returned 1590
Number belonged 2 years or more 814
Number belonged 2 years or less 776
Breeds being bred:
New Zealand 956
American Chins 134
Giant Chins. 64
Standard Chins. 40
Angoras 55
English 83
Viennas 5
Silvers 4
Piruvians 10
Dutch 297
Califorians 362
Satins 97
Champagnes 120
Creme DeArgents 14
American Blues 2
Flemish Giants 116
Himalyans 18
Polish 64
Rex 69
Silver Martens 62
Lilacs 7
Black & Tans 13
Silver Fox 11
Nederland Dwarfs 3
Belgian Hares 8
Palominos 13
Checkered Giants 89
San Juan 1
Beverans 14
Havanas 35
Breeding does 40,640
Show Stock Sold 11,273
Where sold: Consumers 1,058
Processors 562
Laboratories 325
Produce 100# or more mo 235
Produce 100# or less mo. 397
No. Process themselves 410
Number have markets 1,625
Number have problems 502
Number don’t have problems 631
Forms completed 733
Forms not completed 857
Prospective members 1,039
Cavies 6
Alabama 10
Arizona 11
Arkansas 15
California 76
Canada 28
Colorado 32
Connecticut 27
Delaware 2
Washington, D. C. 2
Florida 34
Georgia 14
Idaho 2
Illinois 116
Indiana 98
Iowa 68
Kansas 33
Kentucky 23
Louisiana 15
Maine 10
Maryland 15
Massachusetts 33
Michigan 70
Minnesota 28
Mississippi 9
Missouri 62
Montana 18
Nebraska 18
New Hampshire 7
New Jersey 30
New Mexico 13
New York 81
A.R.B.A. YOUTH RABBIT CLUB
This branch of the American Rabbit Breeders Association was formed with the expressed purpose of bringing to the Junior Breeders a program to train, educate and encourage today and develop you into future rabbit breeders of tomorrow.
This club will be under the guidance of the ARBA Youth Rabbit Committee. Their job is primarily to plan the activities that will be carried out by this club. To create advantages for your project by promotion of plans and ideas that will be of interest and benefit to you by being a member.
Club members will hold offices of President, Vice President, and Directors and be active within affairs pertaining to the operation of club business. The office of Secretary-Treasurer will be handled by an adult be-
cause of the large amount of correspondence.
Members of this club will be entitled to every opportunity that can be made available. They may register their own rabbits for a regular two dollar fee. Record systems will be available and it is to your advantage to make use of these. Show sanctions will be available for Youth shows whereby regular ARBA rules will prevail. Six special ARBA ribbons will be offered as well as special Junior grand champion legs. Interesting contests and prizes will be held from time to time. A special Junior show will be held in conjunction with every National Rabbit Convention. This will give you the opportunity to enter your rabbits in National competition and for you to enter the National Junior judging contest along with very fine awards.
With all the many appealing features this club will offer you it is recommended that you maintain membership in the ARBA if finances will permit. A large part of this club membership are now ARBA members and it is important for you as a rabbit breeder of today and very definitely as a future breeder, registrar, judge, or officer to be a part of this organization for the additional benefits it will give you.
NOTE: The above is a page from the Youth Rabbit Club Official Guide Book.
THERE'S MONEY IN EARTHWORMS
A NEAR PERFECT COMBINATION for RABBIT BREEDERS
32 page booklet with all details beds and pits illustrated. Also booklet RABBIT FACTS. Both for 35 cents
EDWARD H. STAHL
HICKMAN MILLS 31-A MISSOURI
ALLEN C. SMITH
Owner of Advertising Company Dies in Florida
Allen Christian Smith, owner and founder of the Allen C. Smith Advertising Company, passed away on April 21, 1958 at the Lee Memorial Hospital in Fort Myers, Fla., after a brief illness.
Mr. Smith, who founded the agency in 1920 had lived in Naples, Fla., about 10 years. He had come to Kansas City from Chicago and for a time was an accountant executive of the Gray Advertising Agency before he started his firm.
He was a graduate of William & Mary college. He was a member of the Kappa Alpha fraternity. His birthplace was Urbana, Va.
Mr. Smith was a charter member of the University club of Kansas City. He also was a member of the Advertising and Sales Executives Club and of the Sons of the Revolution. He was a member of the Broadway Methodist Church.
He was active as a Mason, with membership in the York lodge No. 536 and the Ararat Shrine.
Allen Smith was interested in Guinea Pigs. Author of the booklet, “QUINEA PIGS Their Raising and Care,” and some years before some of our present old timers were heard of Mr. Smith’s advertisements, “RAISE GUINEA PIGS”, appeared in most of the large Farm, Outdoor, Poultry and other publications. The firm’s name being, Cavies Distributing Co.
Mr. Smith was an active member of the “National Breeders and Fanciers Association” (now ARBA) and in 1918 a member of the Board of Directors. With this kind of background it was only natural, when the ARBA started its National Advertising campaign in 1949 that the account be given to the Smith Agency.
A very fitting tribute was expressed by one of the pallbearers when he said, “Allen lived a full life, he did not want everything for himself, he wanted the other fellow to have something too.” Yes, Allen was one of those who came, lived beyond the three score and ten and departed, leaving many fond memories with his many friends who miss him. To his wife, Mrs. Lela Smith, and son William we extend heartfelt sympathy.
Edw. H. Stahl
JUNE-JULY, 1958
A. R. B. A. OFFICIAL BULLETIN
PAGE NINE
SENSATIONAL ADVERTISING FOR A SENSATIONAL PRODUCER
BY TOMMY ANDREW, CHAIRMAN ARBA—COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT—ARBA
RABBIT FUR MARKET BULLETIN RABBITS: Domestic Whites; Calif., clean assortments, six to the lb, furriers, dressed 42ȼ per skin. Central section early clean assortments, mostly butcher types $1.05 per lb. Central and Western section, fair average, hatter types 70 to 75ȼ per lb. Colo, bucks and does 65ȼ per lb. Domestic Colored; Central and Western section average accumulations 27ȼ per lb. Calif, bucks and does 20ȼ per lb. The market for rabbits has continued slow. Total sales 34,913 Rabbitskins. 4,095 lbs. Rabbitskin.
A product such as we have to offer through the rabbit industry should be advertised in a sensational manner. The A.R.B.A, does all it can to promote the use of Domestic Rabbit by the public as a food. To do more would take considerable more revenue. Many folks do not realize the vastness of this country of ours and to what extent consistent advertising would cost in order to be effective. To advertise a product throughout our nation and to obtain results from said advertising would take many many thousands of dollars and this is what we do not have in sufficient amounts.
In the meantime, there is a way to obtain “sensational” advertising for our product. We are 6,000 strong voices, creative minds, willing workers and with organiaztion there is strength. Strength which when pulling together can put across a program of promoting the fine product of Domestic Rabbit. By the use of gimmicks, word of mouth, and various promotions we can push Domestic Rabbit to the top. However, we must hold together .under one organization with a common purpose in mind, to promote the Domestic Rabbit industry first last and always and leave our own selfish interests in the background. Meanwhile, we should endeavor to make those 6,000 voices grow to even greater numbers thereby increasing the volume of our message so it will be heard in all parts of the nation. By constantly talking, advertising, shouting and eating Domestic Rabbit we can have our message heard. But no one is going to do it for us. We must strike out alone. Each and every person who is interested in the rabbit industry must constantly promote their product or as the old saying goes, “Blow Your Own Horn”.
The A.R.B.A, does as much as they possibly can for the benefit of the commercial breeder. They provide meat posters, car emblems, testing grounds for the breeders herds (shows), rubber stamps for promotion of rabbit as a food, meat cartons, recipe booklets, reports on market conditions, (via articles from the various committee members), marketing suggestions in their Guide Book, outlets for the by-products and many many more helps. Sometimes we wonder what more is needed unless its to turn the product into cash and place the hard cold cash in the hands of those who think otherwise.
True, there are many things that remain to be done, but seems to us the individual should contribute something towards this end. Constructive ideas and promotions are always welcome so long as they are concluded with practical methods of accomplishment. Let’s not gripe when attempts to carry out some of these suggestions are made by your association and it becomes necessary for the organiza-
tion to ask for funds to bring these accomplishments about.
Let’s use our “sensational” gimmicks that we have and really publicize our industry. Use the rubber meat stamp on your mail, notepads which you place in strategic locations such as telephone booths. Our car emblem displayed prominently on our cars. Place our sales material where it will do some good rather than let it gather dust on a shelf. Genuinely try to make an effort to get our message across at all times.
GET READY for this year's outstanding event
THE 35TH ANNUAL A.R.B.A. CONVENTION, SPRINGFIELD. ILL.
"FUR NOVELTIES OF DISTINCTION’’
Write for Catalog to JUDGE TOMMY ANDREW’S
T-BAR-A RABBITRY
SHAVERTOWN, PENNSYLVANIA For extra profits Show Fur Novelties Made of Rabbit Over 100 Items
CALIFORNIANS - AMERICAN CHINCHILLAS
For Show — BRED — For Meat
All Breeders From Registered Stock — A.R.B.A. Registrar
"HIRAM'S RABBITRY" #2111
Phone GLendale 4-3574 PROMPT
Rt. # 6, Box 528 Replies to all
Louisville 7, Ky. Inquiries
GET TOP RESULTS
IN MEAT, WOOL,
WITH THE COMPLETE
JIM DANDY
RABBIT RATION
16 OR 20% PROTEIN
MANUFACTURED BY
WESTERN GRAIN COMPANY
BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA
JUNE-JULY, 1958
A. R. B. A. OFFICIAL BULLETIN
PAGE TEN
CLUBS and ASSOCIATION ACTIVITIES
LOCAL - STATE - SPECIALTY
WANTED — Exclusive items of interest regarding clubs.
Associations and their activities not to exceed 200 words. Omit cost of membership. Items by specialty clubs to mention only breeds they sponsor
THE CALIFORNIAN SPECIALTY CLUB
Porter W. Powers, Secretary-Treasurer 21080 Laguna Canyon Road Laguna Beach, California
Possibly you are interested in another breed of rabbit to compete on the show table, for commercial purposes or perhaps as a project for one of your children. Regardless of what your needs may be, you would do well to look into the Californian; it will fulfill your demands.
The Californian is one of our most beautiful show rabbits, medium in size and easily handled. It is an alert animal and poses well on the show table. Californians produce good size litters and because of their even disposition, they make wonderful mothers taking excellent care of their young. Their even disposition and temperment make them an ideal animal for your youngster to work with. As a pet for your child, you have a trustworthy animal as well as one the child will admire and respect. Young and old enjoy handling this dependable rabbit.
Whatever needs are in a rabbit the Californian will fulfill it.
Write today for our leaflet “Cali-forians — A Profitable Business ... A Profitable Hobby.”
For a Rabbit that is TOPS on the SHOW TABLE or the DINNER TABLE its the CALIFORNIAN Dues $2.00 per yr.
Guide Book & 6 issues of the "News”
Porter W. Powers, Sec'y. 21080B Laguna Canyon Rd. Laguna Beach, Calif.
Write for FREE Leaflet
AMERICAN SATIN RABBIT BREEDERS ASSOCIATION
By Mrs. C. B. Allen 200 East Burney Madill. Oklahoma
SATINS
The Satin is a breed produced and perfected in America. The first Satin was a sport which appeared in a litter of normal Havanas in 1931. Since then other colors have been perfected. The Satin breed has a uniform Satin type that is blocky, tapering slightly from hindquarters to the shoulders. Very plump and full over and around the hips with firm meaty saddle carried as full and meaty as possible to nape of neck and down sides over ribs and shoulders.
AMERICAN POLISH RABBIT CLUB
C. A. Henry,
Secretary - Treasurer 49 Auburn Street,
Saugus, Massachusetts
I would like to report the progress of the American Polish Rabbit Club for the last 16 months. Our membership has increased about 400% during this time. We have had two new colors added to the standard, namely the Black and the Chocolate Polish. These are now official standard varieties, and should be included in figuring sweep-stake points etc.
We also brought out a new Guide Book and standard, which was well received and has brought us quite a few members as well as some for the American. Our new membership applications include a joint membership clause.
We have done some advertising in both the magazines in official A.R.B.A. Bulletins as means permits.
We had a very good year on sweep-stakes in 1957, but 1958 applications will prove an all time High.
We held our first all Polish show April 12, 1958 at Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania and was pretty well supported, and gave our National Secretary, Mr. James Blyth a good work out.
I personally made this trip of 1200 miles to attend and had a good time. We could have had more members present, but weather conditions were bad, anyway its a start.
Satin fur is the first and only change in the make-up of the normal rabbit fur, the striking difference being the texture of the fur which is soft and silky and has a decided brilliancy. It is smaller in diameter and has a more transparent hair shell. This greater transparency of the outer hair shell makes the color show through more clearly, thus Satins appear more intense in color. The sheen and luster
R. L. SOUERS ----------
As we go to press word was received that Mr. R. L. Souers, 5302 Hamilton Ave., St. Louis, Missouri. A Member, Registrar and Judge of the American Rabbit Breeders Association, died suddenly. Another Pioneer of the Rabbit Industry who will be missed by the many friends he has made throughout the years.
CANDIDATES
WHO HAVE FILED FOR OFFICE IN THE COMING ELECTION
PRESIDENT Dick F. Parker, Ala.
VICE-PRESIDENT John C. Fehr, Ind.
TREASURER Dr. Max Andrews, Ind.
Lou Slavans, Ill.
BOARD OF DIRECTORS
Tommy Andrew, Pa.
Vern Ashton, Ohio Harry Hurlburt, N. Y.
Carl Kroboth, Ky.
Ellis W. Murray, Calif.
J. E. Rowe, N. Y.
Edw. H. Stahl, Mo.
Charles A. Wade, Ark.
is due to the clarity of the glasslike
hair shell, and its ability to reflect light. Ideal Satin fur should be fine, very dense and thick to the touch. It must have an appearance of distinct, glossy, lustrous sheen.
Satins are a combination of commercial and fancy so if you are looking for a breed that will answer both purposes, try Satins.
Satins
"The Rabbit of Beauty and Distinction” Commercial or Fancy
The American Satin Rabbit Breeders Association Mrs. C. B. Allen, Sec’y,
200 East Burney Madill, Oklahoma
Membership $2.00 which includes guide book and Satins News. The Fancy Fur Breed — Chartered with A.R.B.A.
Polish
All Standard Colors
N. Z. Whites, Out of Red-White • Blue Seal Registered Parents Usually A Few Good Dutch For Sale — Fancy Cavies Peruvians and Abysinians
HENRY RABBIT FARM
49 Auburn Street — Saugus, Massachusetts
JUNE-JULY, 1958
A. R. B. A. OFFICIAL BULLETIN
PAGE ELEVEN
BIOGRAPHY
J. E. (TED) HOLTZINGER Ted as his many friends call him started with rabbits in 1914 when 11 years of age. An English gardener on his paper route made him a gift of a very good little herd of Belgian Hares when he left to go back to England to enlist in English Army for World War 1. They were top flight pedigreed animals from imported stock. Ted won nine blue ribbons on them before he was twelve years old. Winning best buck and best rabbit all varieties in show in a New Jersey show when 13 years of age. There were 56 senior Belgian bucks in that show and over 250 Belgian hares entered. Rest of varieties accounted for 76 entries. The buck sold for $75.00 at auction conducted after show and from then on he was really interested in rabbits. Found out at the very start that only the best will pay off in the long run.
Started with Flemish in 1926 and has had some of that original bloodline in his hutches since that time. Bred numerous varieties with considerable success since he started but at present time has Flemish Giants and New Zealand Whites and reds. Bought Dr. Krajicek’s fine herd of whites shortly after he was taken ill with last sickness and most of his New Zealand whites in present herd are from these bloodlines which he has managed to maintain intact. Biggest thrill. That’s hard to say. Got a big kick when he had ten out of first twelve places in fur class at Grand Rapids, Mich, convention show on rex rabbits but guess the most fun he ever had was in 1936 when Vern Reeder who had been telling him for years that Flemish had no competition in shows, placed one of the five New Zealands Ted had taken along as company for Flemish to the New Haven convention show first and best opp. and then placed another first and placed all five within the first three of their respective classes. Got a big kick out of ribbing Vern after the judging telling him the five were produced by a Polish Flemish cross and almost convincing him that this was so. Of course it was not true, the original bloodlines came from another Flemish breeder, W. A. Seldon of Provo, Utah.
Right now Ted is kept pretty busy as publisher of a good sized daily newspaper.
Has just finished a very busy year as President of the Pennsylvania Newspaper Publishers Assn. Also serves as Director of the Altoona Trust Company Board, The Columbia Savings And Loan Board, Butcher and Hart Manufacturing Co. Board, Member of Board of Trustees of the Pennsylvania State University.
With all this still finds an hour or so a day to spend with his stock and says, “When I retire ten years or so from now I will have something to do that I thoroughly enjoy doing.”
J. E. Holtzinger
THE AMERICAN CHINCHILLA RABBIT BREEDERS ASSOCIATION
By H. G. Wells, Publicity Director 5702 Jacksboro Pike. Fountain City, Tenn.
Today, I think the American Chinchilla is one of the best perfected rabbits of all breeds. The chinchilla rabbit at the present has three main points for being famous. First, for food; I think a person can produce a litter of chins as good and as cheaply as any other breed.
Second, for fur is the chin well-known. The chinchilla fur of today is the result of many years of experiment in keeping the proper ring and surface color, as well as even length of fur, which requires constant selections. The furriers will not use a fur in a garment unless it is of very good quality. Therefore, it is a challenge to us for a uniform pelt.
The third point is for show rabbits. The show is very beneficial to help us along these lines — the judges tell us the qualitiies of our rabbits, either good or bad. From this we find out what to breed for. We should be active members by supporting the shows. This is good advertising as well as it is educational. One rule to remember is that it does not cost anymore to produce a good chinchilla than it does to produce a scrub, so try to raise the best.
Let’s all be a good chin booster and not wait for John to do all the boosting. Just remember that God helps those who help themselves.
CHAMPAGNE D'ARGENT FEDERATION
By Oren R. Reynolds Secretary - Treasurer 3438 MacArthur Rd.
Decator, Illinois
With the coming of summer the Federation has been received more and more requests for our sweepstakes show sanction and inquires for breeding stock. With but few exceptions those breeders who have tried Champagnes and kept records usually stay
with them. We feel that this is largely due to the ability of the Champagne doe on feed conversion, the fast growth and high dress out of the youngsters. Although the fur can’t be clipped and dyed, when prime it will command a good price from any furrier that produces garments from his fur.
All in all, our Champagne is rated among the best as a meat producer and will always draw attention in the show room, so why should they not be included in any plan for a rabbitry?
AMERICAN STANDARD CHINCHILLA ASSOCIATION
Tommy Andrew, Sec'y-Treas.
74 Terrace Drive Shaverstown, Penn.
In the year 1913, Chinchilla Rabbits were first exhibited in Paris, France, by M. Dybowski. In 1919, Mr. M. W. Meek imported the first Chinchilla rabbits into the U. S. and immediately their popularity was established. In 1928 approximately 10,000 Chinchilla rabbits were registered with the A R. & C.B.A.
Since this early beginning, there has sprung from the Standard Chinchilla, the Heavy-Weight and the Giant Chinchilla. This is why the Standard Chinchilla is called “The Grandaddy of all the Chins.”
They have the ideal type for the commercial raiser as it is not unusual to raise 4 pound fryers at 8 weeks of age. Being the smallest of the three recognized breeds of Chinchilla rabbits, they naturally require less feed, which makes for more profit for the raiser.
Every member of the family can enjoy Standard Chins, as they are very gentle and of excellent disposition. Women and children enjoy the ease of handling them, whereas, larger breeds are sometimes quite too heavy. They are once again on the popularity rise when we compare that last year we had 21 Sweepstake Shows on Standards and already this year we have twenty already scheduled. Be on the look-out for Standard Chins at the shows.
AFFILIATED
50% CLUBS and ASSOCIATIONS 100%
WITH 50% OR MORE A.R.B.A. MEMBERSHIP
ILLINOIS
Freeport R. & F. B. Ass’n Mrs. Helen Hornburger, Sec’y Route 4
Freeport, Illinois 100%
Kiam-Egyptian R. B. Ass’n W. T. Robinson, Sec’y 418 E. Chestnun Anna, Illinois 100%
Tide Water Rabbit Breeders Ass’n. Mrs.
Portsmouth, Va.
MISSOURI
Heart of Am. R. R. Ass’n Wm. E. Herdlinger, Sec’y P.O. Box 515 Kansas City 41, Missouri 50% PLUS OHIO
Cincinnati R. B. Ass’n H. Gentner, Sec’y Cincinnati 39, Ohio 50% PLUS
Ann Eley, Secy., P.O. Box 748 100%
ILLINOIS RABBIT NEWS “SI” S. D. Schertzer, Says In the last issue of the A.R.B.A. Bulletin we note they are wondering if there are any Local Clubs which are 100% ARBA. I personally know of two Clubs in our State that are 100%, ARBA. One of these Clubs has been for the past three years. It is mandatory in the By-Laws of both of these Clubs that each member must belong to the ARBA. If your Club is another one please drop a line to Ed. H. Stahl, Hickman Mills, Mo. and inform him of this fact.
JUNE-JULY, 1958
A. R. B. A. OFFICIAL BULLETIN
PAGE TWELVE
JUDGES and REGISTRARS
ONE INCH SPACE $3.50 PER INSERTION
Who Desire to Assist You and Serve You Register Your Rabbits — Judge Your Shows
C. F. SIMPKINS
4191 MERCER ROAD DECATUR, GEORGIA Judge and Registrar
BROTHER THOMAS, C. O. THE ORATORY ROCK HILL, N.C.
Judge and Registrar
MARION BESS
JERSEY RIDGE RD. MAYSVILLE, KY.
Registrar Rabbits & Hutches
RAY J. GRABLES
527 SUNSET DR., RT. 2 MILFORD, MICH.
Judge and Registrar
JOE T. PRIESTLEY
1108 POLK ST. VICKSBURG, MISS.
Registrar
AL BJORKEN
BUZZ HOLLOW RD. MONROE, CONN.
Judge and Registrar
GERALD L. HEWITT
STAR ROUTE WEBSTER, TEXAS Judge and Registrar
JOHN LONG
1019 EAST MAYFAIR ORANGE, CALIF.
Registrar
W. L. PATTON
69 GODBY STREET LOGAN, W. VA. Registrar
E. W. MURRAY
1714 WEST 106TH ST. LOS ANGELES 47, CALIF
Registrar
ROBERT W. SCOTT
220 FILMORE ST. RIVERSIDE, N.J. Judge and Registrar
W. H. KENNEDY
222 SOOSE ROAD PITTSBURGH 9, PA. Judge and Registrar
F. E. BAUGHMAN
1825 CRYSTAL AVENUE FINDLAY, OHIO Registrar
R. E. PEMBLE
3010 10TH AVE.
ST. PETERSBURG, FLA.
Judge and Registrar
LESTER C. WELLS
P. O. BOX 13 OAKLANDON, IND. Judge and Registrar
AMERICAN ENGLISH RABBIT CLUB
By Ward Hatcher, Secretary-Treas. Rt. 3, Box 144-A Mountain Grove, Mo.
With an entire lack of becoming modesty and nauseating arrogance, the American English Rabbit Club boasts that it is not only tha fastest growing specialty club in the United States but has advanced its breed farther, longer and stronger than any other club in the past 10 years. “Bragging,” sez you. “Facts are facts,” sez I. Ten years ago it was a rarity to see an English at a show. Today a large percentage of shows list English as the largest entry. How come? The Club is composed of fine fellows and ladies, good showmen all, with no fault-finding, no bickering, and no failure of support . . . PLUS some opulent gentlemen with wide open pocketbooks — that’s how come.
CARLDON GADDIS
R.R. NO. 2 WINCHESTER, IND. Judge and Registrar
ED BEAMER
16358 BROADWAY MAPLE HEIGHTS, OHIO Judge and Registrar
MARVIN H. LANGELAND
2730 APPLELANE AVE. KALAMAZOO, MICH. Judge and Registrar
JIM BLYTH
Judge
Rabbits & Cavies
Licensed A.R.B.A.
4323 Murray Ave. Pittsburgh 17, Pa.
LOUIS S. HEIM
3609 BUCKINGHAM RD. BALTIMORE 7, MD. Registrar
Seriously, there has never been any dissention in our Club. Its 125 members have worked cooperatively together. Losers have shown sportsmanship and it has been proved time and time again that a fellow walks up and admires a rabbit the owner is just as likely as not to say, “O.K., take him home with you.”
Since the first All-English Show after the war, in Louisville, Kentucky, with an entry of 184 English only, it climbed to the All-English at Bloomington, Illinois, with an entry of approximately 500 rabbits, give or take a few. All-English shows have averaged 350 head.
Yes, fellows, that’s why we brag. We brag for these English breeders who have so unselfishly and steadily boosted our breed. Our membership roster shows youngsters of 12 and oldsters of 75. So, in behalf of officers of the Club we say to the membership simply, “Thank you.”
JUNE-JULY, 1958
A. R. B. A. OFFICIAL BULLETIN
PAGE THIRTEEN
AMERICAN CHECKERED GIANT CLUB INC.
By Eugene B. Shultz, Sec'y.
502 First National Bank Building Alton, Illinois
When you decide to raise Checkered Giants, you will find it a grand hobby, both for youngsters and oldsters. It can be a self-supporting, and for some, a profitable hobby.
The Checkered Giant breed originated in France 80 years ago. It started with a cross between a Black Flemish Giant and an English Spot. Later is was taken to Germany where the markings were improved.
Shortly afterwor World War I, the German Checkered Giant was imported into the United States. The breed we know today is called the American Checkered Giant because the most important improvement and development has taken place since it was brought to the United States in 1918.
In nearly every litter of babies you will find distinct types of Checkered Giants: First, the best marked ones with butterfly nose marking, spine marking and side markings; Second, the solid black or blue “Sports.” About ¼ of the babies will be solid color. They are throw-backs to the original cross that started the breed. Third, are the kind of babies we call “Charlies.” They have split butterflies and very little spine markings and side markings. The “Sports” make 5 lb. fryers in two months. They really grow fast. The marked ones also grow as fast as the “sports”. The best marked ones, with the right kind of body type will be kept for breeding stock, and the “sports” and mismarked ones
YOUR NAME AND ADDRESS WILL APPEAR IN THE 1958 MEMBERSHIP ROSTER IF YOU JOIN OR RENEW NOW SEE APPLICATION BELOW
are dressed for fryers. This makes the Checkered Giant a perfect utility and fancy rabbit.
AMERICAN BEVEREN CLUB
By Robert H. Knowles, Secy.
R. R. 2, Quakertown, Pa.
The Beveren rabbit is a medium sized rabbit of compact commercial type with wide meaty back and broad well-rounded hips making it one of the practical commercial breeds. Beverens produce litters of proper number that reach marketing size in eight or nine weeks, with an abundance of fine-grained, full flavored white meat. There is a minimum of offal, so a minimum loss in dressing. The character-
istic that distinguishes the White Beveren from other white rabbits is the bold, brilliant, blue eyes. Under current conditions in the United States, there are economic advantages with a white rabbit. The Beveren is the only commercial sized white rabbit with the blue eyes. This fact has no commercial value; but, it adds to the distinction of the breed for the fancier. It sets the Beveren apart from the common white rabbit which has pink eyes. The Beveren is an adaptable breed that can be raised in any climate where the hutches are suitable for that climate. The American Beveren Club is always ready and willing to assist in any way possible to assure success with Beveren Rabbits.
For SHOW, FUR & MEAT, NEW ZEALANDS CAN'T BE BEAT
''AMERICA’S FAVORITE BREED”
Raise NEW ZEALANDS, join our FEDERATION, receive guide book, New Zealand Newsletter and membership card. For membership—send $2.00 to Walter N. Mann, Sec'y. 811 E. Prospect St., Indianapolis 3, Indiana. Combination membership with A.R.B.A. $4.75. Send 10ȼ for descriptive folder.
AMERICAN RABBIT
BREEDERS ASSOCIATION, INC.
ITS PURPOSE
• To promote, encourage and develop the rabbit and cavy for the purpose of establishing a well organized central body charged with the duties of carrying out this object.
• To provide a center of information and advice on all matters pertaining to the above industry—housing, breeding, markets, etc.
• To promote by all possible means original investigation in the industry, and with that object in view to keep in touch and cooperate with institutions of learning and men of science interested in the industry.
• To cooperate in securing national legisla tion and rules governing and regulating the industry and to aid by all means in the en forcement of these rules and regulations.
• To preserve the pedigrees and descriptions of these animals (rabbits and cavies) and to perfect and carry on a registration system for the same.
BECOME A MEMBER
Of The American Rabbit Breeders Association, Inc.
SEND ALL MEMBERSHIP APPLICATIONS TO, James Blyth Sec'y 4323-BN Murray Ave., Pittsburgh 17, Pa.
The Largest Organization Of Its Kind In The World Sponsoring All Breeds of Rabbits And Cavies
TO YOU
The New And Future Producer Of Rabbits And Cavies.
NEVER IN THE HISTORY
Of The American Industry Such Value As This
For A Single Membership Fee You Will Receive
GUIDE BOOK
320 Pages. A Practical Guide To Success ful Rabbit Raising
BULLETIN
Issues: Jan., March, May, July, Sept., Nov. One Of Them A Special Issue Containing Full Name And Address Of Each Member
INDIVIDUAL MEMBERSHIP $3.00
Husband & Wife Combination $5.00)
USE APPLICATION BLANK JOIN OR RENEW TODAY
JUNE-JULY, 1958
A. R. B. A. OFFICIAL BULLETIN
PAGE FOURTEEN
THE BIG ISSUE
THE AUG.-SEPT. ISSUE OF THIS BULLETIN
is the
Special YEARBOOK SUPPLEMENT Issue
This is THE BIG ISSUE in which the entire A.R.B.A, membership will appear.
BE A PART OF IT.
SUPPORT IT WITH AN ADVERTISEMENT
TO YOU . . .
• THE RABBIT RAISER Increases your breeding stock sales by offering them to beginners who are buying as well as to breeders who wish to add to their herd.
• THE EQUIPMENT DEALER Those who offer Hutches, Feeders, Crocks, etc. Here you will find additional outlets for your goods.
• THE EARTHWORM PRODUCER Rabbit raisers in increasing numbers are adding earthworms, you can reach them by an advertisement in the Bulletin.
• THE MAGAZINES Here you can reach prospective subscribers at low cost, persons who will patronize your advertisers.
• THE JUDGE & REGISTRAR Keep your name constantly before the ARBA members, Clubs and Associations who have use for your services.
• CLUBS & ASSOCIATIONS To the local Clubs an opportunity to publicize your Club meeting place and dates, gives breeders in your locality a chance to attend and join. To the Specialty Clubs and others is presented an opportunity to secure members. Breeders of your favorite breed. The Clubs that grow are those that ADVERTISE.
THE TRAIN AND THE ENGINE
Contributed by J. Cyril Lowit, Director
I heard a good one the other day regarding advertising and thought our members would be interested in it.
"It seems quite a number of years ago before competition was as keen as it is today, that a very close friend of William Wrigley asked him why he continued to spend so much money on advertising. This friend of Mr. Wrigley's said, after all Mr. Wrigley your chewing gum is in practically every store in the world, you have counter displays in prominent places in most stores. Air Lines give your product away, and I doubt very much whether there are very few people in the world that never heard of Wrigley's chewing gum.
Mr. Wrigley answered in this way, "did you ever see or stand in a railroad depot and watch the steam engine chug and puff to get the train going, if, after the train got rolling up to 50-60 miles an hour, just what do you think would happen if they unhooked the engine?"
There is no longer any doubt. The lead is being provided by our great organization, its advertising nationally has brought results far beyond the expectation of many of us. Elsewhere in this bulletin you will note that in the first four month of this year 389 members were secured by advertising the beginners booklet against 226 in the same period in 1957, a gain of 163. These are new members, how many more joined that cannot be traced could be a very pleasant surprise.
The above, important as it is, is not the complete story, far from it. The real story is Breeders of rabbits, especially those interested in the sale of breeding stock by advertising, sell all they can produce and in some instances have called on other breeders to help fill the orders. Specialty Rabbit Clubs are not only increasing their membership but are creating more breeders for the breeds they sponsor. Magazines are adding subscribers, one of them reporting 350 subscriptions added in a single month, plus many renewals and gives the A.R.B.A, publications credit for this.
CONSISTENCY IN ADVERTISING BY THE A.R.B.A., BY THE RABBIT RAISER, THE EQUIPMENT MANUFACTURER, THE MAGAZINES, CLUBS AND ASSOCIATIONS, JUDGES AND REGISTRARS, ETC., IN A LARGE MEASURE RESPONSIBLE IN KEEPING OUR INDUSTRY GOING.
Advertising Rates SPECIAL
YEAR BOOK SUPPLIMENT ISSUE
SPACE
1 Inch-Judges & Registrars ....$3.50
2 Inches - 1 x 4¾ Inches
Or 2 x 2¼ Inches................$7.00
3 Inches-1½ x 4¾ Inches
Or 3 x 2¼ Inches...............$10.50
4 Inches -2x4¾ Inches
Or 4 x 2¼ Inches ..............$14.00
6 Inches - 3 x 4¾ Inches
Or 6 x 2¼ Inches..............$21.00
¼ page, 3¾ x 4¾ inches........$23.50
½ page, 4¾ x 7¼ inches........$45.50
Full page, 7¼ x 9¾ inches.....$90.00
SPECIAL POSITION INSIDE COVER PAGES ..........$100.00
CIRCULATION
NOT LESS THAN 8000 COPIES SEND ALL ADVERTISING COPY to
JAMES BLYTH, Secretary 4323-BN Murray Avenue Pittsburgh 17, Penna.
ADVERTISING CONTRACT
OFFICIAL A.R.B.A. BULLETIN
PUBLISHED and DISTRIBUTED BY AMERICAN RABBIT BREEDERS ASSOCIATION. Inc.
4323 Murray Avenue. Pittsburgh 17. Pennsylvania Mr. James Blyth, Secretary
American Rabbit Breeders Ass'n.. Inc. DATE................. 19
4323 Murray Ave., Pittsburgh 17, Pa.
You are hereby authorized to insert the advertisement of the undersigned in the OFFICIAL A.R.B.A. BULLETIN on the following basis. Payment to he made for space used according to rates as shown below.
SPACE WANTED ( ) 1 Inch Judges & Registrars $3.50 — ( ) 2 Inches $7.00
( ) 3 Inches $10.50 ( ) 4 Inches $14.00 ( ) 6 Inches $21.00
( ) ¼ Page $23.50 ( ) ½ Page $45.50 ( ) Full Page $90.00
( ) One Issue ( ) TF ’‘Meaning Till Forbid” your ad- appearing In each issue.
Where no copy for advertising is provided prior to closing date of publication, you are authorized to repeat the last advertisement used.
□ Inclosed $................. □ Send Statement (Bill) with checking copy.
CLOSING DATE NEXT ISSUE JULY 5, 1958
Authorized by
Name........
Address......
City
State
JUNE-JULY, 1950
A. R. B. A. OFFICIAL BULLETIN
PAGE FIFTEEN
Rabbits
RAISE rabbits successfully by knowing facts. 48-page illustrated book describing 25 breeds, housing, feeding, breeding, marketing, etc. Plus bulletin, 25 cents. American Rabbit Association, 100 ARBA Building, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
YOU GUESS
By Francis P. Riffle Secretary P. O. Box 4 Middle Branch, Ohio
Don’t look now, but my name is at the end of this item. First try to identify me from the following statements.
I am an old but a fascinating breed. My name is somewhat a misnomer. My original home started in China. It is an international rabbit, found in many countries. I am a fine grain and an all white meat breed.
A breed which can be recognized easily. Black on nose, ears, feet and tail, and its pink eyes stand out in contrast with my white body. My shape is a snaky type which means round and long and shows a very neat appearance. Ideal weight is 4 pounds. What breed am I?
My coat should be short, fine in texture and pure white. I am a hardy breed, easily bred, makes excellent mothers and need only half the hutch room needed by the larger breeds. I am primarily a show breed and an ideal breed for the beginner.
So for show, meat and fur my breed is tops in anyone’s hutches. What breed as I? HIMALAYAN.
NORTH AMERICAN MARTEN RABBIT CLUB
By Ray Shupe, Secretary 447 Dickinson Avenue Van Wert, Ohio
We the members of the North American Marten Rabbit Club are not large in numbers but what we lack in numbers we certainly make up for in determination, loyalty to our Breed and to each other and a general belief it only comes to he who works hard.
At the beginning of this year we set our sights high, we are making great strides to accomplish those goals set, for example we determined we would have at least $200.00 in our premium list for the ARBA CONVENTION at Springfield, I11., as of April 1, 1958 we have reached that goal. This means almost 2.00 per member. We have made this effort because we believe in our Breed, in our Club in the ARBA and in the future of the Rabbit Industry in general, we believe that all breeders of all Breeds must work hand in hand to ultimately reach success in this Industry and that we can only work hand in hand through the ARBA which is our Parent Organization that all good ideas for the future of the Industry should be passed on from the specialty Clubs to the proper departments of the ARBA and then acted upon and responsibilities handed out at each years Convention.
All-Metal Hutches
Three- and six-compartment hutches. Wire mesh floors with metal pans for easy cleaning.
Write for illustrated description and prices.
Also manufacturers of exhibition coops for shows.
KEIPPER COOPING CO.
3245 W. Burnham Street MILWAUKEE 15, WIS.
AMERICAN RABBIT JOURNAL
FRANK H. HOLLMANN, Editor
Combine with Angora Rabbit Magazine Leading Trade Magazine Of The Commercial Rabbit Industry (Est. 1931)
$1 FOR ONE YEAR $2 FOR THREE YEARS
Canada and other Foreign Countries 50c a year extra.
Articles on Markets & Marketing, Hutch Construction, Rabbitry Management, Experiment Stations, Butchering, New Ideas, Rabbit Diseases and Much More.
Written by Practicing Commercial Breeders for Your Information. Especially for breeders who must make money with Rabbits.
AMERICAN RABBIT JOURNAL
DEPT. A-D WARRENTON, MISSOURI
$ $ PROSPERITY WITH FREE START $ $
Raise Registered Rabbits on SHARE-THE-WEALTH PLAN GIANT CHINCHILLAS - WHITE FLEMISH GIANTS WHITE NEW ZEALANDS
AMERICAN CHINCHILLAS
NO CASH REQUIRED Up to $250.00 in breeding stock supplied.
Pay original cost in young stock produced.
Business volume and capital makes possible our amazing Special Offer, withdrawal after 500 Breeders added.
Let’s commercialize, help us produce HI-CLASS breeders, Laboratory & Meat Stock, Coney.
Complete Information on Beginners Greatest Opportunity, Book, Photographic Hutch Plans, Prices — $1.00 Postpaid (Refundable).
SEND ONE DOLLAR TO START OUR PARTNERSHIP BEHRENS BUNNYVILLE Pearl River 14, New York
Ribbons & Rosette Awards . . . Using Official ARBA SEAL . . .
Free Catalog . . . Also Complete Line of Show Trophies . . . Immediate Engraving Service . . .
Manufacturer:
Ev. Stineman
Tel: 4265 South Fork, Pa.

Original Format

Bound magazine