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American Rabbit Breeders Association

ARBA Bulletin 1958 Vol. 1, No. 5 – April-May
Collection: 1958 ARBA Bulletins

Title

ARBA Bulletin 1958 Vol. 1, No. 5 – April-May

Subject

ARBA member periodicals

Description

Creator

American Rabbit Breeders Association

Publisher

American Rabbit Breeders Association

Date

1958

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English



Citation
American Rabbit Breeders Association, “ARBA Bulletin 1958 Vol. 1, No. 5 – April-May,” ARBA Digital Library, accessed July 16, 2024, https://arbalibrary.org/item/13.
Text

THIS N' THAT
LONG GREEN
"Some Ohio conservation officials say that Henry T. Downey, of Youngstown, found a $20 bill in the mouth of a rabbit he shot, but they deny feeding bunnies that sort of lettuce as a hunting attraction.” New Haven Register.
100% CLUB
Bill Robinson reports a 100 percent Local A.R.B.A. membership club, (See Clubs and Associations Activities) are there any more? Are there any local clubs whose members are 50% or more ARBA members? LET US HEAR FROM YOU.
MEMBERSHIP BUTTON
Several letters have been received suggesting that the A.R.B.A. have a button made of its present emblem in bronze, silver or gold. It would be rather expensive to have dies made, still if enough members are interested and let their wishes be known we will look into the matter.
A RECORD ENTRY
“Biggest exhibitor honors at the 1958 National Western Stock Show held at Denver, Colo, probably will go without contest to Pat Herman, Derby, Colo, rabbit breeder. It is the biggest entry by any single rabbit breeder in the history of the show.” Rocky Mountain News.
The Questionnaire
This refers to the questionnaire recently sent to all members. The Secretary reports, out of 5,008 mailed, 1530 were returned of which 547 had no problems, 467 did. Some could not sell their rabbits, others who did, stated that they did not get enough money for them especially the fryers, 396 did not answer these questions. Complete details will be published later.
MIKE AND HIS TROPHY
Benny F. Hill, Director of the Youth Committee and Organizer of the ARBA Youth Rabbit Club presents the Special Clock Trophy to Mike Eich, 14 years old, of Templeton, Iowa. Awarded to Mike as winner of the Youth Judging contest at the convention held at Little Rock, Ark. last October. The 6th director of the Young Club has been appointed, it is Lina Gardner of Rolling Hills, Calif.
Photo Courtesy Small Stock Magazine
THE VOICE OF THE AMERICAN RABBIT BREEDERS ASSOCIATION
VOLUME ONE
NUMBER FIVE
An American Rabbit Breeder's Association Publication April Second 1958 Edition May
ARBA
ARBA
APRIL-MAY, 1958
A. R. B. A. OFFICIAL BULLETIN
PAGE TWO
FEHR'S Rabbit Necessities
TATTOO OUTFIT —
(Complete with Ink.) .......... 75c
DISINFECTANT—(Makes 3 Gallons) 60c LIQUID SULPHO—A Conditioner ... 60c
EAR CANKER REMEDY ............... 60c
COLD REMEDY—One of the Best . . 60c ABOVE $3.15 VALUE—$2.50 POSTPAID RABBIT DISEASES—The Cause. Prevention and Cure—HAVE IT HANDY . ,25c RAISING SMALL STOCK—Describing 25 Rreeds of Rabblts-Cavies-Hamsters-
Chinchillas .................... 25c
RAISING RABBITS FOR PROFIT—For The Beginner, or Experienced Breeder
48 pages ...................... 50c
RABBIT HUTCHES—Self Cleaning, 31 Actual Photographs Shows How to
Build .......................... 50c
I CHOSE RABBITS—Its Different. Teaches Successful Methods. How to start.
Continue, Market. 96 Pages ....$1.00
DOMESTIC RABBIT PRODUCTION By Geo. S. Templeton, Director, U. S. Babbit Experiment Station. 13 Chapters 100 Subjects—201 Separate Items. Best Rabbit Book Published.
PRICE $3.50 POSTPAID — FREE Rabbitry Supply CATALOG —
JNO. FEHR
1302 Woodlawn Ave. Indianapolis. Ind.
where to find
Dr. Max R. Andrews
Sandy Flemish New Zealand White
1117½ S. Clinton Street
FORT WAYNE, IND.
WESTON'S DEPENDABLE AND PROVEN
Kit contains special marking ink, dies (¼" and ⅜") plus NEW tong with concealed spring to prevent pinching; deeper throat for use from any angle; Digits changed Individ-ually from front. $4.00 and up according to numbers or letters wanted.
See your dealer or
Send for FREE Illustrated Price Folder
WESTON MFG. & SUPPLY CO
and good service
The Store with the Checkerboard Sign . .. that’s headquarters for rabbit raisers across the country. They make it headquarters because it’s where they get Purina Rabbit Chow and the many “extras” that are available to folks who feed from the Checkerboard Bag.
“Extras” like sales and promotional helps; like Rabbit Chow’s ability to help develop top quality fryers and show stock . . . plus the benefits of Purina’s years of research on feeding rabbits for profit.
So make it your headquarters, too . . . THE STORE WITH THE CHECKERBOARD SIGN.
RALSTON PURINA COMPANY • St. Louis 2, Mo
OWENS TROPHIES
— Your Best Buy —
AVAILABLE FROM YOUR LOCAL DEALER OR CLUB REPRESENTATIVE. IF YOUR CLUB DOES NOT HAVE A REPRESENTATIVE WRITE FOR CATALOG AND SPECIAL PRICES.
R. S. OWENS & CO.
4939 N. ELSTON AVE. - CHICAGO 30, ILL.
1923 Speer, Delivery 4, Colo.
APRIL-MAY, 1958
A. R. B. A. OFFICIAL BULLETIN
PAGE THREE
My message to you at this time is one of great importance, a message that brings you information concerning a plan that has been talked about, by our members for years, but nothing has been done about working the plan to a reality. This plan was the idea of creating a Youth Club in ARBA. I am now happy to inform you that we now have the ARBA Youth Club being organized.
In the beginning of my administration, last year, I appointed Mr. Benny F. Hill, Chairman of the Youth Committee. Mr. Hill being a Director of ARBA, I felt sure he could do the job that would be required to make the Youth Idea come true. Along with Mr. Hill, I gave him a committee of eight other members of ARBA. All these members I knew were interested in the Youth of our Association. Mr. Hill did not lose any time in starting this big job of organizing this Club. With the help of the other members of this Committee work was started, visitations were made to other organizations, that sponsored the Youth, many letters were written, and many phone calls were made, in an effort to gain information that would be helpful in the organization of our Youth Club. We can not praise the Committee enough for the great work they have done, but we can show them that we appreciate their efforts and work by helping them with their work, from now on.
The more I think about the future of our Rabbits, the more I realize we must go all out for this Youth Club. What is going to happen, with our Rabbits in years to come, if we do not lay the ground work today, for the Youth of tomorrow, who will be the ARBA, in a few years. Time is drawing near when our oldtimers will be passing on, you and I will not be here much longer. What will happen to our work, of the past years, if we do not train the Youth of today to carry on? In my travels of last year and this year, where I was judging a show, or when I was just visiting a Breeder, I learned that the Youth of our Country ready and willing to take up the raising of Domestic Rabbits. I judge many shows that gave the Youth space, in the show room, for them to hold their own show. In one show that I judged, this year, there were 98 Youth entries and I want
you to know that I was very agreeably surprised at the quality of the rabbits that they had raised, no doubt some of this stock would have been winners in the adult show. I was well pleased to see so many of the Youths interested in showing their rabbits. When the judging was going on all the Boys and Girls gathered around the table to hear the remarks given on their Rabbits. Most of them copied down in their note book just what was said about the rabbits. When I came to a Rabbit that had a bad fault, I would call for the owner of the Rabbit and show them the trouble, and by the same token, I would praise the good Rabbits. During the judging I want you to know that there was not one complaint made by any of them, not a word was said but each one of them stood still waiting to hear what was said.
Now that this Dream or Plan has become a reality it is your place and your responsibility to see that it is carried on to the advantage of ARBA as well as the Youth of our Country. You may say, how can I help. There are many ways that you can help, one is to get the members of your Club to sponsor a local Youth Club in your local Club or Association. By you helping develop this plan you will be insuring the welfare of the Domestic Rabbit in years to come, you will be doing your part to help the Youth of your town cut down the Juvenile Delinquency. Start a Youth Club in your own Local, write to Mr. Benny F. Hill, Chairman of the Youth Committee of ARBA, address 1603 N. Roberts Street, Amarillo, Texas, he will send you the necessary information and papers. There are many Boys and Girls in your town that would like to be a member of the Youth Organization that is sponsored by the American Rabbit Breeders Association.
If I can be of any help to you, in the organization of a Youth Club in your town, please write me.
Sincerely yours,
President.
SPECIAL COMMITTEES
ADVERTISING COMMITTEE
Under Edw. H. Stahl, Gen. Chair.
James Bunt, Chr., California
R. G. Weston, Colorado
Orlan Onskt, California
BULLETIN COMMITTEE
John C. Fehr, Chr., Indiana
Harry Herrlein, New York
Walter Mann, Indiana
YEAR BOOK COMMITTEE
James Blyth, Chr., Pennsylvania
Walter E. Rawsthorne
Robert L. Riggs, Pennsylvania
MEMBERSHIP DRIVE COMMITTEE
Wm. E. Herdlinger, Chr., Missouri
J. C. Lowit Oregon
Vincent Hunter, Washington
Marie Downing, Ohio
ADVISORY COMMITTEE
Harry G. Herrlein, Chr. New York
John C. Fehr, Indiana
Oscar F. Schultze, Connecticut
James Blyth, Pennsylvania
Vern Ashton, Ohio
Ed H. Stahl, Missouri
GRIEVANCE COMMITTEE
Oscar F. Schultze, Chr., Connecticut
Wayne Willman, Ohio
Fred R. Applegate, Illinois
LABORATORY COMMITTEE under
COMMERCIAL DEPT
Harry Hurlburt, Chr., New York
W. W. May, Texas
Harry Herrlein, New York
EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH
COMMITTEE
Harry G. Herrlein, Chr. New York
R. W. Dubbell, Arkansas
James Blyth, Pennsylvania
Vern N. Ashton, Ohio
Dr. Charles A. Slanetz, New York
ORGANIZATIONAL SURVEY
COMMITTEE
Ellis W. Murray, Chr., California
J. E. Rowe, New York
Ray Grables, Michigan
John McLain, Virginia
Ray Gentry, Mississippi
Sam Gerardi, Pennsylvania
John Long, California
SHOW PLANNING COMMITTEE
J. C. Lowit, Chr., Oregon
Dorothy Bayliss, California
Lynn Eastham, Texas
James Blyth, Advisor Pennsylvania
SHOW RULES COMMITTEE
J. C. Lowit, Chr. Oregon
Carl Kroboth, Kentucky
Ed Beamer, Ohio
John C. Fehr, Advisor, Indiana
PRESIDENT VICE PRESIDENT
DICK F. PARKER JOHN C. FEHR
4901 South Fifth Ave. 1302 Woodlawn Ave.
Birmingham 6, Ala. Indianapolis 3, Ind.

OFFICERS
DIRECTORS
SECRETARY TREASURER
JAMES BLYTH DR MAX R. ANDREWS 4323 Murray Avenue 1117½ So. Clinton
Pittsburgh 17. Pa. Ft. Wayne 2, Ind.
FRED R. APPLEGATE VERN ASHTON BENNY F. HILL CARL P. KROBOTH J. CYRIL LOWIT ELLIS W. MURRAY 1707 E. Carpenter St. 1626 Oakland Parkway 1603 N. Roberts 107 Westwood Dr. Route 2, Box 160 1714 West 106th St.
Springfield. Ill. Lima, Ohio Amarillo. Texas Lexington, Ky. Troutdale, Oreg. Los Angeles 47. Calif.
HARRY HURLBURT OSCAR F. SCHULTZE EDWARD H STAHL Bainbridge, N. Y. Westport Avenue Hickman Mills. Mo.
Norwalk, Conn.
A Personal Message
from the president
APRIL-MAY, 1958
A. R. B. A. OFFICIAL BULLETIN
PAGE FOUR
PUBLISHED BY AMERICAN
RABBIT BREEDERS ASSOCIATION 4323 Murray Ave., Pittsburgh 17, Pa.
OBJECTS
“To maintain a registration and recording system — afford memberships to persons interested in breeding and marketing of rabbits and allied products — promote and conduct public and private exhibitions — provide judging systems — license its official judges and registrars — make and revise official standards — organize and assist local, County and state associations and specialty clubs — maintain information bureaus — furnish at cost, bulletins, guide books, booklets, posters, placards, supplies and textbooks to members and to the public — investigate markets — assist in securing legislation and publicity — hold annual conventions and meetings of its members and board of directors,
MEMBERSHIP FEE $3.00 PER YEAR
WANTED - Items Of Interest
Please observe the following when contributing articles.
1. Keep them short.
2. Must be on general interest.
3. Name of writer must appear with all articles.
4. Give sources of information if quoting.
5. Must positively be exclusive for this publication.
ADDRESS All comments, suggestions and articles pertaining to this bulletin to: Edw. H. Stahl,
Hickman Mills 34, Missouri
EDITORIAL COMMENT -FRED R. APPLEGATE
BE ON GUARD YOU MUST BE VIGILANT AT ALL TIMES
ADDRESS All communications concerning business matters, advertising, renewals, new membership applications, non-receipt of bulletin, changes of address, etc., to: James Blyth, Secretary,
4323-BN Murray Ave., Pittsburgh, Pa.
Self preservation is a natural instinct. Of course this saying generally means life, but it can just as logically apply to one’s BUSINESS.
Every BREEDER, and MEMBER of the A.R.B.A., must at all TIMES BE ON THE ALERT to catch any ER-RONIOUS articles, or STATEMENTS, that are published in any Newspaper, or Magazine, regardless of where published, just as soon as you find them, please clip out and send to me by FIRST MAIL. There are several, and the list is growing all the time who send me clippings taken from their Newspapers, and the Magazines they read, both for, or against the Rabbit Industry.
Mr. A. J. Gregory, of Norfolk, Va., sent me an article written by Jeanne Wellenkamp, which appeared in the January 5th issue of “The Norfolk Vir-gianian-Pilot, also in the Portsmouth Star, of Portsmouth, Va. entitled “Pets can furnish source of Money” which contained a very erronious statement regarding “Rabbits,” which was very DEROGATORY, DISPARAGING, and DAMAGING to, not only the “RABBIT INDUSTRY,” but effected every Breeder in that territory.
Every Breeder, and Club member must watch for every article, quotation, or statement that in any way reflects against Rabbits, the Industry, or the A.R.B.A., please send me a clipping of the same, (be sure when sending me any clippings to give me the name of the Paper, or Magazine, the correct name and address is all I need, as I have the names of every Newspaper, Weekly, Radio Station, Television Station, and the names of their Editors, Publisher, Staff, also the Managers, Program Directors, etc. of all Radio and TV Stations) just send me the article, and the name of the paper, magazine, or in case of Broadcasts send me full information, and the Name of the Station on which you heard it, and I will do the rest. Also get every person in your territory to write or call the paper, or Station protesting against same and ask for it to
be retracted, or that you be permitted to write an article, or be allowed time on the Station to give the true facts.
The Statement, Miss Wellenkamp, made was as follows: “Pigeons and rabbits are unfriendly, ungrateful, and unprofitable,” an experienced rancher told me.
NATIONAL DOMESTIC
rabbit week
The dates are, May 18th thru the 24th. Every Club should concentrate every effort to make this the most SUCCESSFUL and OUTSTANDING SPECIAL DAY, WEEK, or MONTH, of the year. Get the Cooperation of your Newspapers, Radio, and TV Stations, interest your Chamber of Commerce, Civic Organizations, Fraternal Organizations, etc. See that you have active committees, and ADVERTISE. Those who advertize are the leaders in their line of business.
When Mark Twain was the Editor of a paper, one of Yus subscribers wrote Yum that he found a spider in his paper, and wanted to know if it meant good luck, or bad. Mark answered right back, saying, “Dear Subscriber: Finding a spider in your paper was neither good luck or bad luck for you. The spider was simply looking over your paper to learn which merchants were not advertising, so that he could go to that store, and spin his web across their door, and live a life of undisturbed peace.”
A Country Storekeeper was asked to take out an ad, and he replied; No Siree, I did that once, and it durned near ruined me. How was that he was asked, he replied; “Why, people came in and bought derned near every thing I had.
FRIENDS
A person has three friends on whom they rely. First, wealth, which goes with them only while good fortune lasts. Second, their relatives, they go with them only as far as the grave, leaving them there. Third, The third friend is their GOOD DEEDS, THESE GOES WITH THEM BEYOND THE GRAVE AND THROUGH ETERNITY.
Advertising Rates
1 Inch, Judges & Registrars only $ 3.50
2 Inches — Single or double col. $ 7.00
3 Inches ” ” ” ” $10.50
4 Inches ” ” ” ” $14.00
6 Inches ” ” ” ” $21.00
¼ page, 3¾x4¾ inches $23.50
½ page, 4¾x7¼ inches $46.50
Full page, 7¼x9¾ inches $90.00
SPECIAL POSITION INSIDE COVER PAGES $100.00
Closing Date Next Edition
MAY 1, 1958
JAMES BLYTH, Secretary-4323-BN Murray Avenue Pittsburgh 17, Pa.
COMMERCIAL RABBIT RAISER'S GUIDE
Altho the title of this 42 page booklet is “Commercial Rabbit Breeder’s Guide and Supply Catalog,” it is in reality a very instructive piece of literature that goes into details on numerous phases of rabbit raising not found in any other publications. A special feature being the answers to 63 questions often asked. This booklet is published by the Glick Mfg. Co., El Monte, California now.
4-H RABBIT RAISING HANDBOOK
A very interesting and instructive booklet, “Bulletin 461,” published and distributed by the Agricultural Extension Service and the University of Maine, written by Roscoe F. Cuozzo, Rabbit Consultant of this institution. Twelve subjects are covered, well illustrated, including 2 pages illustrating ideas on hutch construction giving dimensions of lumber to be used, hardware cloth, hinges, etc.
GET READY for this year's outstanding event
THE 35TH ANNUAL A.R.B.A. CONVENTION, SPRINGFIELD, ILL.
APRIL-MAY, 1958
A. R. B. A. OFFICIAL BULLETIN
PAGE FIVE
Secretary's
Message
By James Blyth
FLASH
No doubt many of you are familiar with the proposed increase in postal rates. Since practically all of your association’s business is done by mail, I am sure you realize the effect this will have on the finances of the American. We have received literature from the Association of First Class Mailers who are organized to protest this increase in postal rates. These people claim the increase is unjust and not warranted at this time. Yet the Post Office Department claims the increase is required. There is no doubt in any of our minds that the postal workers are deserving of an increase in their pay. The Postal Department says they must have the increase to grant the increase in pay. We who do a lot of mailing will be struck a terrific blow with this postal increase which appears at the present time will be put into effect.
According to the Association of First Class Mailers, the Post Office Department makes a net profit of 7% on 3 cent first class mail and that under the proposed increase they would make a profit of 42%. Thus we have two conflicting stories with reference to the increase in the first class rates.
Your local newspapers have no doubt given you the Post Office Department’s side. And if you wish the other side, would suggest you write at once to the Association of First Class Mailers. 8th Floor, 352 Fourth Avenue, New York 10, New York, asking for their literature on this subject.
Regardless of who is right and who is wrong, if the increase is put into effect how are we, the American, to make ends meet with such an increase. Last year we spent $3,194.26 for postage. This is one of our biggest expenditures. Thus to increase this an additional 2 cents on each letter and some increase in parcel post will dig well into our finances. We have at this time one course to pursue and that is to protest to our Congressmen and Senators against the increase in rates. However, if the rate is approved, which no doubt it will be, some action must be taken at our Springfield Convention, October 11-14, 1958. This is one of the big problems that confront us. The reason I am calling this to your attention is because a need for increased revenue for the Association will be needed. We should watch what our associations will do if the increase is approved. No doubt if this increase is approved, your Directors will make certain recommendations in this line at the Springfield Convention. I hope that all of our members will study this carefully and if they feel the increase in postage rates is unjust and unwarranted, they will write the Association of First Class Mailers at once,
EVERY MEMBER'S JOB OUR GUIDE BOOK
Our supply of 1954-1956 Guide Books is drawing near to an end. We have had 15,000 copies of this book printed and it did meet with the approval of our membership. This book was very helpful to many. However, there are a number of articles which need revising and some completely rewritten. At the Board meeting at Little Rock Convention, it was decided to start working towards the publishing of a new book.
We have many members in the American who have a great deal of talent in writing and we hope that many of our members will sit down and write an article for this new Book. All of us have some good ideas. Maybe your article as a whole will not be approved by the Committee, yet it may bring out some new ideas of something we have been looking for.
There are many people starting in the business of raising rabbits for profit and along commercial lines. We must make this new Book a Real Guide for these folks. They write us many questions about various phases of the rabbit industry. They are really hungry for information. By getting out a new Guide Book with the proper information in it, we can help many succeed in raising rabbits and cause them to realize more profit.
We need articles on what breeds you think the best for commercial purposes and why. The best type hutches, proper feeds and methods of feeding, proper method of processing rabbits, care of the fur, how the meat and fur can be marketed and many other subjects. You as a member can help some other raiser by giving your ideas on these subjects. Some write us saying that our literature should contain this, that and the other thing. This is your opportunity to see that things that you think will help other raisers are included in the new Guide Book.
May we have your help?
A REASON FOR EVERYTHING
As far as the A.R.B.A, is concerned it plays no favorites as to breeds of rabbits, it sponsors all. In this issue will be found under “Clubs and Associations Activities,” items supplied by Secretaries of Specialty Clubs who bring out the merits of their particular breeds. Space is available to all Specialty Clubs to boost for their favorites, why not have them all represented in the next issue?
U. S. Rabbit Experimental Station at Fontany to continue operating.
President Dick S. Parker and Secretary James Blyth who have been in Washington D. C. where they appeared before a congress and senate committee in the interest of keeping the U. S. Rabbit Experimental Station in Fontany, California operating.
President Parker wants to inform all ARBA members that the budget for the operation of the Fontany Station has been voted to stand as it has been, and the station will continue in its research work.
OUR MAGAZINES
The rabbit industry is represented by four magazines, these four have stood the test of time. We list them in point of age:
VOL. 42, No. 6, American Small Stock Farmer, 42 Years and 6 Months old. Subscription Price $1.00 Per Year. Published at Fairlawn, N.J.
VOL. 42, No. 3, Small Stock Magazine, 42 Years and 3 Months Old. Subscription Price $2.00 Per Year. Published at Lamoni, Iowa.
VOL. 28, No. 3, American Rabbit Journal, 28 Years and 3 Months Old. Subscription Price $1.00 Per Year. Published at Warrenton, Mo.
VOL. 25, No. 6, National Rabbit Raiser, 25 Years and 6 Months Old. Subscription Price $2.00 Per Year, Published at Minneapolis, Minn.
These magazines have done a tremendous job in helping build our industry and creating interest in rabbits and allied endeavors. The four mentioned are four of many who have stood the test of time, through good times and bad, and to them we extend our heartiest congratulations.
It will be noted that each of these publications is represented with an advertisement in this bulletin. They support and cooperate with the A.R.B.A, and this organization supports them. This is as it should be.
There is only one National Association with its affiliated Local, State, and Specialty Clubs. With all working hand in hand the future of our industry is secure. Let us all, as far as possible, support our magazines by subscribing to one or more of them. Advertise with them, and by all means buy the goods and services that are advertised in them. In doing this, your contributions towards the success and growth of the rabbit industry will mean more than you may realize.
FUR COMMITTEE under COMMERCIAL DEPT.
Tommy Andrew, Chr., Pennsylvania W. F. Gilbert, California
Myrtle Gillis, New York
John C. Popple, California
Mable Higgins, New Jersey
Secretary
APRIL-MAY, 1958
A. R. B. A. OFFICIAL BULLETIN
PAGE SIX
I: EXPLORING A PRACTICAL APPROACH TOWARD THE DEVELOPMENT OF COCCIDIOSOS-FREE RABBITS
Harry G. Herrlein
Chairman, Education & Research Committee
Opinions differ as to whether “mucoid enteritis” in the domestic rabbit is a separate disease entity or acute cocci-diosis.1 Attempts to isolate and identify the causative agent presumed responsible for “mucoid enteritis” have thus far failed. To make further studies possible toward positive identification, it appeared likely that this might be accomplished with rabbits free of cocci-dial infestation. Several methods were considered to provide such animals.
Since coccidial infestation of young rabbits is by oral intake possibly from contaminated teats or fur during early nursing, by-passing this exposure was first attempted by delivery of fetus by Cesarean section. Rabbits, having a gestation period of about 30 days, were mated to synchronize end of term with 21 day gestation period of the laboratory rat. It was theorized that new-born rabbits could be fostered by the rat. Within two hours after removal of rabbit fetuses, twelve rats were selected which had normal delivery during that time, and their young removed. The rabbit fetuses were meanwhile, washed and cleaned with a mild, tepid detergent solution and placed singly under each rat. Although the rat exercised all attempts to apply its motherly instincts, nursing was not accomplished and mortality set in within 3 days due to starvation. This approach was therefore abandoned.
Lactation in the rabbit does not begin before 12 to 24 hours after normal delivery, and normal nursing does not begin during that time. It was, therefore further theorized that infestation could occur during the first few hours of life. Accordingly, new-born rabbits were removed from the nest ½ hour, 1 hour and 5 hours after birth. They too, were immediately decontaminated with a mild, tepid detergent solution and maintained at about 85°F. on soft tissue paper napkins, since sterilized cotton might cause suffocation. Hand feeding was begun about 15 hours after birth and continued at 3 to 4 hour intervals around the clock. Their food intake consisted of equal parts of evaporated milk and tap water, fed tepid via the conventional eye-dropper. Of three litter-mates, two were lost at 4 and 5 days of age, presumably by faulty feeding, the liquid food reaching their lung cavity causing an acute respiratory condition. The survivor of this first group was gradually fed higher levels of evaporated milk and thrived until 15 days of age, when it died suddenly. Its body weight at that time was 235 gms. It weighed 65 gms. at birth. Post mortem examination indicated good development. Fecal matter and intestinal contents were free of coccidial oocysts. The stomach was quite distended with undigested food and the intestinal tract showed severe enteritis. This may have been caused by the presence of some enteric organism, as these rabbits did not receive benefit of early nursing colostrum. The body weight of 235 gms. at 15 days of age appeared abnormally
high, probably due in part to the accumulation of undigested food in the G. I. tract. The distended stomach may have been a contributory factor toward death, causing suffocation by limiting lung function and normal breathing.
Following this, another procedure was initiated. A miniature milking apparatus for milking rabbits, was devised. A number of gestating rabbits were divided into two groups to permit termination of term two days apart. The breast area of those from which the milk was to be drawn was thoroughly cleaned with a mild detergent solution. Milking was begun about 18 hours after delivery and continued at 12 hour intervals for 2½ consecutive days. Each batch of milk was immediately pasteurized and refrigerated. Meanwhile, a group of four new-born young rabbits was taken from two litters at 1 hour and 3 hours after birth. They were divided into two groups of two each from opposite litters. Their weight at birth averaged 60 gms. With the thought that colostrum might check enteric organisms responsible for severe enteritis, one group was fed pasteurized rabbit colostrum exclusively during the first three days. Thereafter, they were fed for 20 days, a mixture of equal parts pasteurized cow’s milk and evaporated milk to which was added 1 mgm. of tetracycline hydrochloride in each 40 cc quantity. One of this group was accidentally dropped at 10 days of age. Its injuires were such that it had to be destroyed. The diet of the survivor was supplemented at 21 days of age with tepid cream of wheat and/or cream of rice cereals and dry bread. The aforementioned mixture of cow’s milk, avapo-rated milk and tetracycline was gradually eliminated. At 30 days of age the survivor was exposed to antibiotic-free prepared commercial, pelleted rabbit feed (ROCKLAND RABBIT RATION), stale dry bread, and tap water. The cereals meanwhile, were also gradually eliminated. Fecal matter was found negative for the presence of coccidial oocysts at 20 days of age. Examination of fecal samples at weekly intervals were found negative. Its body weight at 10 days of age was 100 gms.; at 20 days, 185 gms. and at 30 days 300 gms. From this, it is demonstrated that rabbit fetuses need not be taken by Ce-
sarean section and that removal of young up to 3 hours after birth resulted in negative findings for coccidial oocysts.
A second group was not fed pasteurized rabbit colostrum at any time. They were started at 18 hours of age with the same mixture of pasteurized cow’s milk, evaporated milk and tetracycline hydrochloride. The feeding procedure with this group was identical with that followed in the first graup until 4 weeks of age. The tetracycline supplement, in the absence of colostrum intake, demonstrated its effectiveness in preventing enteritis previously encountered. Examinations of fecal matter for coccidial oocysts were made similar to the first group, and found negative.
In order to bring the problem down to a more realistic and practical level, and to by-pass hand feeding, the possibility of creating a coccodial static period in the parent rabbit during gestation and after delivery with the use of sulfaquinoxaline, was explored. Although Habermann,2 et al., stated “An effective treatment of intestinal cocci-diosis consists of 50 mgm. of sulfagu-anidine in 100 gms. of ground rabbit feed daily for 2 weeks,” he does not qualify whether this approach represented a cure or whether a coccidial static period ensued. Since it was apparent that a long term intake of drugs was indicated, sulfaquinoxaline, being less toxic, was used. Routine examination of fecal material from rabbits of various ages indicated older rabbits to be excreting fewer oocysts. Two 18 month old rabbits were selected which were found to be pregnant after palpating, at 15 days of term. They were fed a concentration of 0.03% sulfaquinoxaline in their drinking water daily, in accordance with the recommendation in the text by L. Meyer Jones,3 and placed in decontaminated, vector-proof, outdoor quarters. Samples of fecal matter were examined four days after the initial daily intake of the aforementioned concentration of sulfaquinoxaline, and thereafter, at weekly intervals, during gestation and for six weeks after term, during nursing. All fecal material was found to be negative for the presence of sporulated coccidial oocysts. After eight weeks exposure to a daily intake of 0.03% sulfaquinoxaline, its toxic effect seemed noticeable in the parent rabbits. Listlessness, poor appetite and general abnormal activity were the gross symptoms. Sulfaquinoxaline feeding was immediately suspended. Their young were then over five weeks of age and as a salvage gesture, were moved to separate vector-
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APRIL-MAY, 1958
A. R. B. A. OFFICIAL BULLETIN
PAGE SEVEN
proof quarters. Weekly examination of their fecal matter was also negative for the presence of coccidial oocysts.
The foregoing serves to demonstrate that a non-sporulating coccidial static condition, when created during gestation and after term, permits the development and production of coccidiosis-free young rabbits naturally. Vector-proof quarters are required to maintain their coccidia-free status thereafter.
Whether long term (8 weeks) daily intake of sulfaquinoxaline resulted in toxic damage to vital organs, one of the mature breeding Does and her litter of four young were sacrificed. Examination of the adult Doe, revealed involvement of one liver lobe, showing extensive cirrhosis and evidence of chronic coccidiosis. On another lobe of the liver, several scars were evident. No coccidial oocysts were found in the bile from the gall bladder. However, an abnormal amount of deep yellow fat was noted in the peritoneal cavity. No toxic damage was found in any of the young at six weeks of age. The foreging would indicate that a mature Doe, when fed a therapeutic level of 0.03% sulfaquinoxaline daily for eight weeks, would not be physically suitable for use as a continuous breeder.
An adverse but interesting development occurred with two remaining hand-fed young. They had been negative for coccidiosis up to 8½ weeks of age. When 7 weeks old, they were fed a supplement of fresh lettuce and cabbage leaves, obtained from local markets. Subsequent fecal examination about 10 days later, revealed the presence of liver type oocysts. Sulfaquinoxaline was fed orally at once but was ineffective. Since there was no salvage approach, timothy hay was then fed. Within another 14 day period, fecal examination showed the presence of both liver and intestinal type oocysts. It would therefore appear safe to presume that run of mine market greens and commercial hay to be the sources of infestation by reason of contamination as their quarters were vector proof.
(MUCOID ENTEDITIS EXPLORATORY WORK,
IS NOW IN PROGRESS.)
Throughout these studies, the method for examination of rabbits for presence of coccidial oocysts by C. A. Slanetz was followed as it was found to be more sensitive than the method by Becker, et al.4 Slanetz’s method is presented here in full:
RABBIT COCCIDIOSIS METHOD
Flotation Method for Detection of Coccidial Oocysts in Rabbit Fecal Material
C. A. SLANETZ, Ph.D.
(Scientific Director, Institute of
Comparative Medicine
Columbia Medical Center, N. Y. C.)
Approximately 5 to 10 grams of fecal material are prepared by mixing thoroughly in 10 to 30 ml. of tap water and filtering through a coarse filter. The filtrate (10 to 20 ml.) is poured in a 100 ml. Erlenmeyer flask and saturated sodium chloride solution is added to within a few millimeters of the top of the flask. Four to six hours later a suitable loop (5 mm.) is used to tranfer some of the surface film in which the oocysts are concentrated, to a glass slide for microscopic examination.
Examinations of surface film are
made for sporulated and non-sporulated oocysts. An average count of several oocysts per low power microscopic field is considered a light or early infestation.
As a guide to the stage of coccidial infestation the following arbitrary counts pmf are suggested:
1 to 10 oocysts per microscopic field, low; 10 to 50 oocysts per microscopic field, moderate; 50 and higher oocysts per microscopic fiield, severe.
— ACKNOWLEDGMENT —
I am extremely grateful to Dr. Charles A. Slanetz for his guidance, interest, time, material and technical assistance which he so generously contributed to make this work possible.
REFERENCES
1 Iweihaus, M. J., School of Vet. Med.,
Kansas State College, Agr. Exp. Station.
- Habermann, Robt. T., William, F. P. Jr., Thorp, W. T. S., “Identification of Some Internal Parasites of Laboratory Animals,” Public Health Service Publication No. 343, U. S. Gov’t. Printing Office.
:i Jones, L. Meyer, “Vet. Pharm. and Therapeutics,” Iowa State College Press, Third Printing, page 547, 1956. 4 Becker, E. R., Coccidia and Coccidiosis of Domesticated, Game and Laboratory Animals and Man. Collegiate Press. Ames, Iowa, 1934.
(Presented at the annual ANIMAL CARE PANEL meeting, Nov. 8th, 1957 and submitted for publication in 1958 A. C. P. Proceedings.)
MAURICE S. SIXBY
Pioneer Angora Rabbit Breeder
Maurice S. Sixby, 70, of 94 Melrose Street, Buffalo, N. Y. prominent pioneer of the Angora Rabbit industry, in good health during the winter months, passed away after a short illness at 10 A.M. on the morning of March 15.
Mr. Sixby was well known throughout America and Canada, and for many years spent much of his time working for the welfare of the Angora Rabbit, attending many of our conventions and leading shows in the eastern part of the United States and Canada. For many years Publisher and Editor of Angora Rabbit Magazine now published as part of the American Rabbit Journal with Mr. Sixby as Editor of the special angora section.
The passing of Mr. Sixby is a groat loss in the ranks of the Angora Rabbit industry and to the American Rabbit Breeders Association as well, being identified with the latter as a member for many years. All who knew him and all who have been In contact with him for many years will miss him.
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APRIL-MAY, 1958
A. R. B. A. OFFICIAL BULLETIN
PAGE EIGHT
BIOGRAPHY
OSCAR F. SCHULTZE Always liked animals and when he was eight years old his cousin gave him a pair of French Lop eared Rabbits. He took good care of them and raised quite a few, also acquired several others so that he had quite a mixed bunch when his father started to hint about the cost of feed. Oscar thought it was time to do something about it so took about 30 head out to the woods and let them go and never saw any of those rabbits again, figured the hawks and foxes had a feast on them. Then got some Belgian Hares and Flemish Giants and was in business, done rather well with these breeds and made a little money, had rabbits ever since then, enjoyed them every moment. Got his judges license from Chas. Gibson and has judged quite a few shows. Has been an active member of the A.R.B.A. ever since.
There could not have been anything more fitting than the honor shown, this one of the real old timers when he was presented with a bronze plaque at the convention held in Little Rock last October. With it went a beautiful scroll with 165 names of those who contributed to show their appreciation to one who has been active in the affairs of the ARBA for such a long time. His name will appear on the “Hall Of Fame” Plaque that is displayed at the Home Office at Pittsburgh and says
“I have held office in the ARBA for many years. And hope that as long as I live I will be able to do something for this Association, because I know that when anyone does anything for the ARBA he also does something for Rabbits and those who are interested in them. The honor bestowed on me at the convention at Little Rock is something that I will cherish always.”
Oscar F. Schultze
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2 Edward H. Stahl, Mo. 8 Breeders Assn. Iowa 8
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4 W. T. Robinson, I11. 4 3 York Co., R.B.A. Pa. 6
5 Bob Madsen, I11. 4 4 Springfield R.B.A. Ohio 6
6 Cliff Cook, Ill. 4 5 Iowa Progressive R.B.A. Iowa 5
7 Bill Herdlinger, Mo. 4 6 7 Spoon River R.B.A. I11. Illinois-Triangle R.B.A. I11. 5 5
8 J. C. Fehr, Ind. 3 8 Des Moines R.B.A. Iowa 5
9 Glendon King, La. 3 9 Auto City R.B.A. Mich. 5
10 J. G. Smith, Ga. 3 10 Goshen R.B.A. Ind. 4
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12 Beacon Milling Co., N.Y. 3 12 Northside R B.A. Ind. 4

YOUTH DIVISION
Benny F. Hill, Chairman The Youth Specialty Club now has over 50 members and is growing every day. This includes memberships from 18 states which is very good representation.
One very interesting development is a project for the Youth members to instruct and have available information for making fur garments and various fur novelties. It is planned that we will have a nice display of this work at the National Convention this fall. Junior Grand Champion legs and ARBA Special Ribbons are available to those shows holding Youth Specialty Club sanctioned shows. This sanction is $1.50 and along with information on the fur project, and memberships, is available by writing Mrs. Daisye Valouch, 425 South West Ave., Bethany, Okla.
THE YEARBOOK—GUIDE BOOK
The most important thing that I want to mention at this time is the importance of each member renewing their membership promptly when notified by me that the membership is about to expire. I again make this suggestion because every time the membership list is published I receive complaints that names were omitted from the list. Almost without exception it has been found that such members were in arrears. I most certainly do not want to drop one member. Your cooperation in this will be appreciated greatly.
All members have no doubt noted that there will not be a year book this year. The complete membership with full name and address will appear in the August issue as a supplement.
It really is remarkable the way the time flies at each of our conventions. We feel that there are twelve long months until the next one comes but before we are aware of it the months fly by and all the plans made cannot be carried out. Soon we will enter into the second half of 1958 with plenty to do in the months just ahead.
James Blyth, Chairman
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APRIL-MAY, 1958
A. R. B. A. OFFICIAL BULLETIN
PAGE NINE
BIOGRAPHY
DR. MAX R. ANDREWS Started raising Rabbits in the Spring of 1936. Had moved out in the country in August 1935.
His father-in-law Ignatz Gruber had raised rabbits for many years, he was also a registrar under the old registering system. He was crippled by an automobile around 1934 and had a neighbor taking care of his stock, but in 1936 his neighbor passed away. Knowing how he felt about his rabbits Max went over and told him he would take them out to his place and take care of them if he would tell him how, each Sunday he would take over some rabbits for him to look over and tell him about them.
Whenever Max had the opportunity of showing the rabbits to others he would refer to them as Gruber’s. His first show was at Fort Wayne National Convention in 1936 and won Grand Champion Flemish that was the turning point. He joined the Flemish Federation, The ARBA and Fort Wayne Rabbit Breeders in early fall of 1936. Also won Grand Champion in 1938 at Columbus, Ohio as well as at Allentown, Pennsylvania, which was the largest entry of Flemish 796.
Succeeded Lewis J. Griffin as Secretary of the Flemish Federation and held that office until 1950. Is still a member on Board of Governors. Was elected Treasurer of ARBA in 1942 which position he still holds.
Has been a resident of Fort Wayne, Indiana since 1913. Has three children and eleven grand children.
One of the highlights of his rabbit raising was when he was presented with a gold watch at the convention at Little Rock and a beautiful scroll by his many friends in appreciation of his contribution to the success of American Rabbit Breeders Association and the rabbit industry, and says
“The fine people I have met, the many friends I have has kept me working for rabbits and since I have raised most of the different breeds and I like them all. I have been registering and judging for the past ten years and have kept busy with my various jobs for the ARBA. I am sure I will be raising rabbits just as long as my heart permits, and I feel that I am in better health because of my rabbits.”
COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT OF THE A.R.B.A.
By Tommy Andrew. Chairman, 74 Terrace Drive Shavertown, Penna.
The extremely cold weather and the recent slump in business is predicted that the rabbit fur business will be better. First, it has stirred the fur market by causing the public to make a clamor for fur garments. Trade has picked up in recent weeks. Secondly, the Union in the fur market has seen fit not to call a strike at the expiration of their contract probably because they realize that business cannot stand’ much more in demands promises that the fur buyers will be active for sometime to come.
The price of beef and pork has risen steadily in the past few months and therefore should make markets for our domestic rabbits. Much planning has been made by your officers of the ARBA in the past few months and they have come to realize that the foundation of this industry is to be built on the commercial phase if we are to rise to greater heights. The commercial side of the domestic rabbit industry can be and will be the backbone of this industry in years to come if it is to be a major factor in the live stock of our country. The Youth Division, under our Director Benny Hill, is cooperating immensely in training our youth towards this goal and it is the Youth of the nation that will carry it on.
Our National Conventions have taken a turn toward educational sessions wherein our breeders are instructed in various phases of making one’s rabbitries successful and the coming convention to be held at Spring-
field, I11. is already being planned with even more of these features for the commercially minded breeder. The ARBA has done more for the commercial breeder during the past two years than ever before in its history and the planning board of said organization has some startling and progressive stages yet to come. If the commercial
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breeder wants help he must help himself and there is no better way than to get on the bandwagon and join with all the others who want to get ahead. Everyone knows there is strength in organization and certainly there is only one logical organization for a common meeting place for those who do and that is the American Rabbit Breeders Association.
We, in the Commercial Dept., are planning to pass along various phases of the commercial rabbit business via these bulletins. Already we are working on presenting the technique of boneing a rabbit as so ably demonstrated by Oren Reynolds, of Decatur, I11. We are very much interested in hearing from others who may have something just as constructive to offer. A new sales gimmick, an ideal wrapper for domestic rabbit, a new slaughtering technique, housing, feeding, new outlets for by-products and new publicity stunts for promoting domestic rabbit all have a place in this bulletin in order that others may share in them and thus bring us all together for the success of the commercial industry of raising domestic rabbits for America.
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APRIL-MAY, 1958
A. R. B. A. OFFICIAL BULLETIN
PAGE TEN
CLUBS and ASSOCIATION ACTIVITIES
ONE HUNDRED PERCENT AMERICAN
Reported By Bill Robinson
The Kiam Egyptian Rabbit Breeders have had 100% membership in the A.R. B.A. for years. We have a membership fee of $5 which includes Ill. State A.R. B.A. and Local Club dues. It is much easier to sell one package than three. The time to get them in is when they start. Since the issue of the bulletin you have a much better package to sell. Most of our members have been with us from 6 to 15 years. Have been working toward 100% membership of the 30 clubs in I11. Bill Robinson.
AMERICAN STANDARD CHINCHILLA ASSOCIATION By Tommy Andrew, Secretary
74 Terrace Drive, Shavertown, Mo.
The “Grandaddy Of All Chins” the American Standard Chinchilla has made rapid strides in the past few years and prospects look even more brighter for the future. Many are fast realizing that the Standard Chin does meet with the rigid specifications nec-cessary to be an ideal rabbit for com-mericial use. The fact that the “hard-to-breed-for-fur” is most acceptable to the buyer of furs overcomes the prejudice of being a colored fur rabbit. Many of our breeders, by constant culling, have brought their herds to where they produce an average weight animal of 4 lbs. in the required 8 weeks asked for by the commercial breeder. Since the top weight is only 8 pounds we still have a “marketable” carcass when we slaughter a senior weight animal.
The true type produced by the Standard Chins, which have been established for such a long time, makes them desirable by the true lover of the Chinchilla rabbit. Much has been done for the progress of the Standard Chinchilla by the American Standard Chinchilla Assoc., a specialty club that invites all folks who desire a real commercial rabbit that they can profit with and still have the challenge of competition with a colored fur to join with them and enjoy the ride on the “bandwagon of success.”
Join The
AMERICAN STANDARD CHINCHILLA ASSOCIATION
"The Grandaddy Of All Chins”
Quarterly Newsletter — Guide Book and Other Helps DUES $2.00 PER YEAR
Tommy Andrew, Sec'y.-Treas. Shavertown, Pa.
ROBERT ROME, Pres.
125 Morristown Rd. Bernardsville, N. J.
NATIONAL FEDERATION of FLEMISH GIANT BREEDERS by Don Reid, Sec'y-Treas.
Route 1, Lockport, I11.
The Flemish Giant Rabbit and the N.F.F.G.B. are going to be the top Breed in 1958, as far as increase, percentage-wise, in the United States. We have over a 100% increase in Sweep-stakes the first 60 days in 1958. We have a membership contest going on and New and renewals are coming in from all corners of the U.S. and several Foreign Countries. Requests for stock are being received every day. We have a hard time supplying the demand. Most people know that the larger the animal the quicker the young grow. Most of our old time breeders are striving for 6 to 8 per litter and have given up the old fashioned idea of raising 3 or 4 per litter. We are a little lax in producing fur, but that has been a by product. We are showing great improvement in our fur the last few years also. If you do not care for White animals we have 6 other colors to choose from. You can’t loose if you raise Flemish. We have the largest, fastest growing Breed, and every color in the rainbow.
THE AMERICAN ANGORA SPECIALTY CLUB By Eugene Carpenter, Sec'y.-Treas.
R 2 Box 36 CB, Piqua, Ohio
In deciding which breed of rabbit to raise don’t overlook the English and French Angora Woolers. They are A-l for exhibiting and superbly beautiful on the judge’s table when they make your heart skip beats displaying all their glorious and profitable long wool fibres — eight times warmer than sheep’s wool. They are easily one of God’s perfections.
As commercial income producers they are without equal. You can have your cake and eat it too if you prefer to operate for wool production only. Angoras need not be killed to realize a return on your investment because the fibres are harvested every ten weeks or so with ordinary scissors and sold in lots of a pound or more to the buyers who continue to beg for more and more wool.
Some breeders prefer to cull out their excess bucks and any does not up to their high standards of wool production for the fryer trade. This is utilizing the Angora as a dual purpose
rabbit for both meat and wool and both hastens and increases your profits. The meat is deliciously tender and white rich in protein.
In addition to the above — selling meat and wool to commercial buyers, many Angora raisers, especially women, maintain a herd to furnish them plucked wool which they spin into yarn, then knit, crochet or weave into high-fashioned articles which command a better than usual price from the public. Angora is a luxurious specialty fibre so wonderfully soft, warm and beautiful it does not require intricate patterns to enhance its appeal.
Therefore you must realize that the Angora Wool Rabbits capacity to further a part-time or full-time occupation is outstanding and this is the reason there is a constant demand from men, women and children who wish to buy them.
Our National Angora Club has had a phenomenal growth even in these past months of the business recession simply because we sponsor a unique subject. Too, we go all out to help our members whether beginners or experienced breeders by issuing monthly — educational articles, bulletins and rosters of our members. These releases keep all of us informed how best to raise Angoras and make the most of them.
CHAMPAGNE D'ARGENT FEDERATION
By Oren R. Reynolds. Secretary
2428 Mac Arthur Rd., Decatur, I11.
We the Champagne Federation members are proud of our Club, the rabbit we sponsor and the part we portray in the rabbit industry as an affiliate of the A.R.B.A. We have a wide-awake, up and coming Specialty Club with a large percentage of the 48 states as well as 3 foreign Countries represented in our membership.
Our breed of rabbit has proven to be one of the better show attractions as well as a meat producer. It speaks for itself in the showroom through the fact that we have sanctioned approxi-
Champagne - D'Argent Federation
Live Wire Specialty Club JOIN TODAY
DUES $2.00 PER YEAR GUIDE BOOK & 12 ISSUES OF CHAMPAGNE NEWS
OREN R. REYNOLDS
Sec’y-Treas.
3438 MAC ARTHUR RD., DECATUR, ILL.
THE AMERICAN ANGORA SPECIALTY CLUB
Join and raise the world's most commercial rabbit, a dual-purpose breed producing two major incomes from meat and wool. Dues $2.00. Our fast growing club doubled its membership the past six months issuing educational literature and rosters of our members monthly.
Eugene Carpenter, Sec'y-Treas.
Route 2, Box 36 CB, Piqua, Ohio
APRIL-MAY, 1958
A. R. B. A. OFFICIAL BULLETIN
PAGE ELEVEN
mately 100 Sweepstake shown in 1957 and also the Champagnes are as a rule among the largest entries at all shown including the National Conventions. As a meat producer we have our feet firmly planted on the ground, we have placed fryers or fryer pens in the top 3 in almost every National Convention, and our fryers hold their own in dress out percentage equal to and better than most.
Our Club maintains a Monthly News Magazine, have not missed an issue since 1951. We have published two new guide books since 1950 and maintain a bureau of information through special leaflets etc. to help our members and all breeders interested with their troubles and problems.
Our members maintain that we have one of the best breeds of rabbits to produce due to the fact we get a larger percentage of good young per litter, beginners do very well with them as many are winning at the shows along side the so called Old Timers in their first or second year of breeding. If looking towards a bright future in the rabbit industry why not choose one of the best breeds, “Champagne D’Argents.”
THE AMERICAN FEDERATION OF NEW ZEALAND BREEDERS By Walter N. Mann, Secretary 811 Prospect St. Indianapolis 3, Ind.
The American Federation of New Zealand Breeders, largest Specialty Club chartered by the A.R.B.A, and sponsors White New Zealand and Red New Zealand Rabbits. Our Club is composed of New Zealand breeders all over America and a number of foreign Countries and come from all walks of life. Without a doubt, White New Zealand Rabbits are the most profitable to raise, being bred to a point where no other breed can equal it as a commercial meat producer, with a body type which produces a meaty fryer at eight weeks of age. As a show rabbit, White New Zealands are tops and you will find more of them in the show rooms than any other breed. A win in a large class really means something. If you are looking for a challenge to produce a rabbit that comes up to the New Zealand Standard and at the same time produce that rich, reddish color which is so desirable, the Red New Zealand is your answer. Red New Zealands are a combination Fancy and Commercial rabbit. As an exhibition rabbit they are tops and the meat qualities are on a par with any of them. A well developed Red New Zealand Rabbit with that rich, reddish color is a joy to behold. Look for them at the next show you attend. You may be surprised how many good New Zealands you can raise right in your back yard. They are clean, easily cared for and anyone can raise New Zealand Rabbits. Rabbit meat is delicious, all white meat, can be prepared in many ways and can be eaten the year round. They are “America’s Favorite Breed.” “For Show, Fur and Meat, New Zealands Can’t Be Beat.” Look for our ad in this Bulletin. Read our advertisement in all editions of this Bulletin, “The Voice Of The American Rabbit Breeders Associations.” Its Affiliated clubs and Members.
GIANT CHINCHILLA RABBIT ASSOCIATION By Dr. Alfred de Castro, Sec'y.
5 Hunting Ridge Road Stamford, Conn.
The popularity of Giant Chinchillas is growing by leaps and bounds, not only in this country but abroad. The forthcoming Spring Shows will see more Giant Chinchilla Sweepstakes than ever before. A.R.B.A, registrations and Grand Champion Certificates are also on the increase and so is our Club membership, the strongest in many years. If you are interested in this breed and in the Club sponsoring it, send for our free illustrated folder or, better still, join our Club and receive our up-to-date Guide Book, which is full of excellent pictures and articles by America’s leading authorities.
Giant Chinchillas are attracting considerable international attention as proven by shipments of breeding stock to Canada, Bermuda, Cuba, Jamaica, Mexico, Dominican Republic, Puerto Rico, Uruguay, Bolivia and Spain. Last but not least, read the article “Rabbits in Russia” appearing in this same Bulletin, from which you can see that Giant Chinchillas are, by far, the most popular rabbit in Russia. Yes, for food, fur, fancy, friends and fun there is nothing like a Giant Chin.
For many years, we, of the American Giant Chinchilla Rabbit Association, have been saying that the Giant Chinchilla is destined to become one of the outstanding commercial rabbit breeds
simply because it has a meat type second to none and the length and width of body capable of producing five pound fryers in 8 weeks. It is therefore, heartening to see that Giant Chins are already leading all other breeds in a country of such vast proportions as the U.S.S.R. What a pity it is not in the U.S.A., their country of origin!
(Continued on Page 14)
Sponsoring
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Dr. A. De Castro, Sec'y., 5 Hunting Ridge Road, Stamford, Conn.
For SHOW, FUR & MEAT, NEW ZEALANDS CAN'T BE BEAT
"AMERICA’S FAVORITE BREED’’
Raise NEW ZEALANDS, join our FEDERATION, receive guide book, New Zealand Newsletter and membership card. For membership—send $2.00 to Walter N. Mann, Sec'y. 811 E. Prospect St., Indianapolis 3, Indiana. Combination membership with A.R.B.A. $4.75. Send 10ȼ for descriptive folder.
APRIL-MAY, 1958
A. R. B. A. OFFICIAL BULLETIN
PAGE TWELVE
JUDGES and REGISTRARS
Who Desire to Assist You and Serve You Register Your Rabbits — Judge Your Shows
C. F. SIMPKINS
4191 MERCER ROAD DECATUR, GEORGIA Judge and Registrar
BROTHER THOMAS, C. O.
THE ORATORY ROCK HILL, N.C.
Judge and Registrar
TED WENGERT
2830 KINSEY ST. ROCKFORD, ILL. Judge and Registrar
VERN N. ASHTON
1626 OAKLAND PARKWAY LIMA, OHIO Judge and Registrar
G. A. BURKE
HILLIARDS, OHIO Judge and Registrar
TOMMY ANDREW
74 TERRACE DRIVE SHAVERTOWN, PA. Judge and Registrar
GERALD L. HEWITT
STAR ROUTE WEBSTER, TEXAS Judge and Registrar
HAROLD McGOVNEY
1012 N. ELWOOD TULSA 6, OKLAHOMA Judge and Registrar
W. L. PATTON
69 GODBY STREET LOGAN, W. VA. Registrar
WILLIAM DINGMAN
RT. 3, BOX 499 TRAVERSE CITY, MICH. Judge and Registrar
ROBERT W. SCOTT
220 FILMORE ST. RIVERSIDE, N.J. Judge and Registrar
W. H. KENNEDY
222 SOOSE ROAD PITTSBURGH 9, PA. Judge and Registrar
F. E. BAUGHMAN
1825 CRYSTAL AVENUE FINDLAY, OHIO Registrar
RALPH MOSHER
60S KENNEDY ROAD WINDSOR, CONN. Registrar
WILLIAM "BILL" CHANCE
ST. JOSEPH, MINN. Judge and Registrar
LOUIS S. HEIM
3609 BUCKINGHAM RD. BALTIMORE 7, MD.
Registrar
WALTER R. CAUDELL
401 SOUTH SUMMIT AVE. CHARLOTTE 8, N.C. Judge and Registrar
ED BEAMER
16338 BROADWAY MAPLE HEIGHTS, OHIO Judge and Registrar
WILLIAM E. STROUD
NOKOMIS STREET DANVILLE, KY. Registrar
SPECIAL RATES Judges & Registrars 2 Issues $6.50 - 3 Issues $8.50 4 Issues $9.50 Payable in advance
REX WHEAT GERM OIL
Survival factor in Rex Oil helps produce large litters that live!
Rex Oil helps mating, conception and kindling! Rex Oil helps produce prime pelts, lustrous fur!
24 years successful use support these claims.
Prices:
Pint $3.50; Quart $6.00; Gallon $19.00 Write for FREE Booklet No. 6
Lynn & Carrie Eastham
BREEDERS and EXHIBITORS of
WHITE NEW ZEALANDS
2665 Eleventh Street Beaumont, Texas Phone TE 3-8853
APRIL-MAY, 1958
A. R. B. A. OFFICIAL BULLETIN
PAGE THIRTEEN
CARLDON GADDIS
R.R. NO. 2 WINCHESTER, IND. Judge and Registrar
OSCAR F. SCHULTZE
WESTPORT AVENUE NORWALK, CONN. Judge and Registrar
RICHARD F. GRIGGS
6101 FRIENDSWOOD DR. AUSTIN, TEXAS PHONE GL 3-5401
RAY GRUNT
2416 SOUTH LAMAR AUSTIN, TEXAS PHONE HI 2-4777
MARVIN H. LANGELAND
2730 APPLELANE AVE. KALAMAZOO, MICH. Judge and Registrar
YOUR NAME AND ADDRESS WILL APPEAR IN THE 1958 MEMBERSHIP ROSTER IF YOU JOIN OR RENEW NOW SEE APPLICATION BELOW
LESTER C. WELLS
P. O. BOX 13 OAKLANDON, IND. Judge and Registrar
ARTHUR L. NELSON
1806 WEST PIKES PEAK AVE. COLORADO SPRINGS, COLO. Judge and Registrar
JIM BLYTH
Judge
Rabbits & Cavies
Licensed A.R.B.A.
4323 Murray Ave. Pittsburgh 17, Pa.
ALL THE YEAR ROUND MARKET FOR LIVE RABBITS
KRAKAUR POULTRY CO.
N. Y. C. LIVE POULTRY TERMINAL Long Island City 1, N. Y.
US. GOVT. LICENSED DEALERS Established 1883 Tel. STillwell 4-4182
AMERICAN RABBIT JOURNAL
FRANK H. HOLLMANN, Editor
Combine with Angora Rabbit Magazine Leading Trade Magazine Of The Commercial Rabbit Industry
(Est. 1931)
$1 FOR ONE YEAR $2 FOR THREE YEARS
Canada and other Foreign Countries 50c a year extra.
Articles on Markets & Marketing, Hutch Construction, Rabbitry Management, Experiment Stations, Butchering, New Ideas, Rabbit Diseases and Much More.
Written by Practicing Commercial Breeders for Your Information. Especially for breeders who must make money with Rabbits.
AMERICAN RABBIT JOURNAL
DEPT. A-D WARRENTON, MISSOURI
The
AMERICAN RABBIT
BREEDERS ASSOCIATION, INC.
ITS PURPOSE
• To promote, encourage and develop the rabbit and cavy for the purpose of establishing a well organized central body charged with the duties of carrying out this object.
• To provide a center of information and advice on all matters pertaining to the above industry—housing, breeding, markets, etc.
• To promote by all possible means original investigation in the industry, and with that object in view to keep in touch and cooperate with institutions of learning and men of science interested in the industry.
• To cooperate in securing national legislation and rules governing and regulating the industry and to aid by all means in the enforcement of these rules and regulations.
• To preserve the pedigrees and descriptions of these animals (rabbits and cavies) and to perfect and carry on a registration system for the same.
BECOME A MEMBER
SEND ALL MEMBERSHIP APPLICATIONS TO, James Blyth Sec y 4323-BN Murray Ave., Pittsburgh 17, Pa.
Of The American Rabbit Breeders Association, Inc.
The Largest Organization Of Its Kind In The World Sponsoring All Breeds of Rabbits And Cavies
TO YOU
The New And Future Producer Of Rabbits And Cavies.
NEVER IN THE HISTORY
Of The American Industry Such Value As This
For A Single Membership Fee You Will Receive
GUIDE BOOK
320 Pages. A Practical Guide To Successful Rabbit Raising
BULLETIN
Issues: Jan., March, May, July, Sept., Nov. One Of Them A Special Issue Containing Full Name And Address Of Each Member
INDIVIDUAL MEMBERSHIP $3.00
(Husband & Wife Combination $5.00)
USE APPLICATION BLANK JOIN OR RENEW TODAY
APRIL-MAY, 1958
A. R. B. A. OFFICIAL BULLETIN
PAGE FOURTEEN
CLUBS and ASSOCIATION ACTIVITIES
(Continued from Page 11)
AMERICAN CHECKERED GIANT CLUB INC.
By Eugene B. Shultz, Sec'y.
502 First National Bank Bldg.
Alton. I11.
How many rabbit breeders remember when they first selected the breed that they would like to raise and joined their first specialty club? The following letter received recently by a new beginner will bring back those enthusiastic days to many of us: “Dear Mr. Schultz: I received my A.C.G.C. membership card and the American Checkered Giant Guide Book, Saturday, the eighth. I didn’t get a chance to look at it until Sunday. Then I spent the entire afternoon doing so, it was that interesting. I think the book is a very good representative of such a fine breed as the Checkered Giant. I especially liked the illustrations and pictures of the Checkered Giants. The committee which worked on the book did a very nice job and deserve real congratulations. Since Sunday I have re-read it so many times I almost have it memorized. Yours truly, Roger W. Seehafer.”
Many of you who are reading this Bulletin have not decided what breed you wish to raise. If you want a real hobby for both meat and fancy, be sure to join the American Checkered Giant Club and start to raising Checkered Giants. Join the Club first and study the Standard of Perfection. Read all the many articles written by the members. You will then know how to buy your foundation stock. You can tell by the articles and pictures in the 100 Page Guide Book who you wish to write to, to buy foundation stock.
Checkered Giants at two calendar months of age dress out 3 lbs. of meat. You can tell the best marked ones at birth. The black or blue markings show up in the pigment of the skin. Once you start to raising these long, racey type, well marked Checkered Giants you will be anxious to look in the nest boxes for good marked babies immediately after they are born.
Join the American Checkered Giant Club Inc. In addition to the 100 Page illustrated Guide Book, you will receive a 16 Page News Bulletin every two months. The News Bulletin will keep you in touch with all the activities of the American Checkered Giant Club. You will soon become acquainted with all the names of the members who are winning in the Sweepstake Shows.
THE CALIFORNIAN SPECIALTY CLUB By Porter W. Powers. Secretary 21080 Laguna Canyon Rd..
Laguna Beach. Calif.
The Californian, the aristocrat of all rabbits, is one of our comparatively new rabbits. It was created here in California by George S. West, whose aim was for a better commercial rabbit for meat and fur. It was first shown in 1928 and received its standard in 1939. Its acceptance by the commercial and the fancy breeder soon caused its popularity to spread over our land. Today, tho our Specialty Club is only in its twelfth year, we boast memberships in thirty-nine states, Canada and Puerto Rico.
There are very few breeds of rabbits that can fulfill all the requirements that a Californian can. It appeals to the fancy breeder because it is beautifully marked and has a glamour all its own in the show room-disputed by none. To the commercial breeder, it is a small boned, compact type rabbit that packs the meat where the housewife wants it. It is economical to feed, is a good producer and the young are ready for market at eight weeks. Its fur is much in demand since it has a dense coat and is a white pelt.
Our Californian rabbit, without any doubt, is the fastest growing breed of rabbit in the United States today. As a commercial breeder and processor myself, the Californian has everything from my standpoint that could be asked for. I want a rabbit with the highest percentage of dress out possible, plus a meaty and compact looking carcass for the market and then I want a good dense white pelt to bring me the top pelt price.
If you are raising rabbits for the show table or the dinner table and you are not raising the Californian, get wise and buy a few Californians. One breed that is different — it is a winner on the show table for the fancier and a winner on the dinner table for the commercial breeder.
More and more commercial rabbitries throughout the United States are stocking Californians. Last year our Specialty Club sanctioned over two hundred shows at which cur rabbits were shown. Why don’t you, too. get on the Californian band-wagon? Write today for our circular on “Californians, A Profitable Business ... A Profitable Hobby.” Join our Specialty Club and promote the leading rabbit of today.
Decline the Honor
By James J. Metcalfe
Do not become a candidate . . . For any kind of goal . . . Unless you want
to do the job ... With all your heart and soul . . . Accept no nomination now . . . That may be proffered you . . . Unless you feel quite equal to . . . The task you’ll have to do ... In politics, a civic club ... Or some fraternity . . . No matter what the title or . . . Position it may be . . . Do not campaign or look around . . . For other means and ways ... If you are only interested ... In honor and in praise . . . There are so many others who . . . Are quite well qualified . . . And do not seek an office just ... To satisfy their pride.
(Copyright, 1958, Field Enterprises, Inc.) Kansas City Star.
CANDIDATES FOR OFFICE — RESOLUTIONS
Rules under which candidates for office may make applications — rules on resolutions. As provided for in the constitution of the A.R.B.A.
Elections
Any member in good standing of the A.R.B.A. wishing to become a candidate for any office of the A.R.B.A. shall write to the Secretary for a nominating petition, which the secretary shall supply him. These requests shall reach the secretary not later than May 1st of each year. This nominating petition would carry the member’s name and the office he decides to be a candidate for and shall carry the signature of 25 members of the American in good standing. When this petition is filed before the first of June, with the secretary, the secretary shall then place the member’s name who appears on the petition on the nominating ballot.
Resolutions
All alterations, amendments or resolutions to be offered before any annual or special meeting of this Association shall be made in writing and sent to the Resolutions Committee at least sixty (60) days prior to the meeting at which they are to be presented.
(The 35th Annual Convention to be Held October 11 to 14, 1958 at Springfield, Illinois) and said alterations, amendments or resolutions be published at least thirty (30) days in advance of meeting, so that members may have an opportunity to form an intelligent opinion on their merits. All resolutions must be confined to one subject.
That in case where a Resolution or Resolutions are adopted at this convention or any future convention, such Resolution or Resolutions shall take effect January 1st, following the convention.
For a Rabbit that is TOPS on the SHOW TABLE or the DINNER TABLE its the CALIFORNIAN
Dues $2.00 per yr.
Guide Book & 6 issues of the "News”
Porter W. Powers, Sec'y. 21080B Laguna Canyon Rd. Laguna Beach, Calif.
Write for FREE Leaflet
EUGENE B. SHULTZ, SEC., 501
FOR FOOD and FANCY RAISE CHECKERED GIANTS
Sponsored by
The American Checkered Giant Club Inc. Organized in 1918
News Bulletin — Sweepstake Shows Rosettes — Illustrated Guide Book Official Pedigree Books DUES $2.00 per year - JOIN NOW First National Bank Bldg. — Alton, Illinois
APRIL-MAY, 1958
A. R. B. A. OFFICIAL BULLETIN
PAGE FIFTEEN
BRAYS
Ear Canker Ointment
FOR ALL RABBITS
ONE SIZE $1.00 POSTPAID
BUY IT NOW!
• •
BRAY'S — BOX 135
Middletown, Ohio
MARYLAND STATE R.B.A. SPRING SHOW
MAY 4, 1958
TIMONIUM FAIRGROUNDS
5 Mi. North of Baltimore, Rt. 111
Sweepstakes N. Z. Dutch Champs — Flemish — Polish & Californians
For Catalog write Lou Heim 3609 Buckingham Rd. Baltimore 7, Md.
One feed system
BEACON
Complete Rabbit Pellets THE BEACON MILLING COMPANY
CAYUGA, N. Y.
Ribbons & Rosette Awards . . . Using Official ARBA SEAL . . .
Free Catalog . . . Also Complete Line of Show Trophies . . Immediate Engraving Service . . .
Manufacturer:
Ev. Stineman
Tel: 4265 South Fork, Pa.
Good money raising earthworms. Place them under your rabbit hutches. I have the Hy-brid Reds and the Red Golds. You can pay half your feed bill. Write for prices.
RAY MAR RANCH COAHOMA, MISSISSIPPI
$ $ PROSPERITY WITH FREE START $ $
Raise Registered Rabbits on SHARE-THE-WEALTH PLAN GIANT CHINCHILLAS - WHITE FLEMISH GIANTS WHITE NEW ZEALANDS
AMERICAN CHINCHILLAS
• NO CASH REQUIRED
• Up to $250.00 in breeding stock supplied.
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BEHREN'S BUNNYVILLE Pearl River 14, New York

AMERICA'S FOREMOST RABBIT AND POULTRY PUBLICATION
THE NATIONAL
Sample copy 25 cents
Subscriptions:
1 year $2.00
2 years 3 25
3 years 4.00
Rabbit
RAISER
AND POULTRY GROWER
A large, colorful magazine issued monthly — the rabbit Industry’s leading trade journal. World-wide circulation.
Written by professional rabbit raisers with a slant especially valuable to beginners,
GUESSWORK has no place in raising rabbits profitably. Like any other business, you have to know what you are doing. Your subscription to the National Rabbit Raiser magazine is your most inexpensive investment for finding out the techniques which years of experience have taught its writers. Established, successful rabbit raisers have subscribed for years because they continue to discover new ideas in its pages. It follows that the National Rabbit Raiser is a MUST for any beginner.
THE NATIONAL RABBIT RAISER 420-A South 6th Street, Minneapolis 15, Minn.
F
A
N
C
Y
CHARLES A. WADE
c
O
M
M
E
R
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I
A
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Working for Advancement

Original Format

Bound magazine